Alaska AHEC Program Selected as Alaska Career Preparedness Award Recipient

The Alaska Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program is proud to announce that it has been selected as the Alaska Career Preparedness Award recipient for the ACT College and Career Readiness Campaign. As the ACT College and Career Transition Award exemplar for Alaska, the Alaska AHEC has the opportunity to be considered for National Semifinalist status by an ACT Selection Committee. This committee will narrow the extremely deserving field of state exemplars into four National Semifinalists. Finally, a National Selection Committee composed of national education and workforce leaders will choose from the Semifinalists the four National Exemplars, one per category. These National Exemplars, along with all state exemplars and semifinalists, will be honored at an ACT event in late fall 2017. The Alaska AHEC would like to send a special thank you to all their partners and supporters.

Source: Alaska AHEC Program selected as Alaska Career Preparedness Award recipient – UAA Green & Gold News

Week of the Arctic Showcases UAF Energy Research

Hundreds of delegates from around the world were in Fairbanks for the Arctic Interchange.

For researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), the global spotlight is a chance to showcase their work on sustainable energy.

UAF research professor George Roe said right now the diesel generator is the backbone of villages around Alaska. He and his colleagues at the Alaska Center for Power and Energy (ACEP) want to change that.

“We’ve got wind, we’ve got solar,” Roe explained to a group of international journalists, as he showed them around the facility.

Engineers at ACEP can replicate wind streams, river currents and solar energy in the lab and test systems before they’re sent to rural Alaska.

Roe said renewable energy work being done in the Last Frontier can be applied all over the world.

“Alaska’s motto is: North to the future,” Roe said. “We’re required, almost mandated to share what we’re learning and to find opportunities to work with other people and learn from them as well.”

Roe points to Kodiak as a city leading the way in sustainability. Nearly 100 percent of the community’s energy needs are supplied by a combination of wind and water.

“It’s a huge knowledge export opportunity for the state. And in this time of economic diversification, taking this Alaskan know-how and sharing it with other remote communities,” Roe said.

Watch the news segment and read the full article here.

Source: Week of the Arctic showcases UAF Energy Research » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Medical Science Academy at Bartlett High School

For the past eight years, Bartlett High School has been getting the next wave of medical professionals interested in the industry. The program is called the Medical Science Academy, and is open to most students in the Anchorage School District.

Sean Prince, Bartlett’s principal, says it has on primary teacher who teaches a wide range of the classes. Her name is Yvette Stone, and she started the program almost a decade ago. Stone has been teaching for nearly 20 years, according to Prince. She teaches anatomy and physiology classes, even some advanced classes students can get college credit for. Students who go through the program will even job shadow over at JBER. While there, they will experience live births, work in the pharmacy and more.

One soon to be graduate, Sunecke “Journey” Prieto said going through the program reinforced her interest in neuroscience. She plans to go to Oklahoma to pursue becoming a neurologist.

More information can be found at the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium website. Bartlett is an open enrollment school. If a student is interested they, or a parent, can head to the Anchorage School District’s website and apply for an exemption, and then start in the Medical Science Academy.

Watch this Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Medical Science Academy at Bartlett High School » KTVA 11

UAA Starting Surgical Technology Program in Response to Industry Need

The University of Alaska Anchorage is in the final stages of starting a new program that focuses on positions that assist doctors during surgery.

It’s called the surgical technology program, and the curriculum will train students for difficult-to-fill positions in the state’s health care industry.

Robin Wahto, director of UAA’s School of Allied Health, said the Surgical Technology program was created in response to industry need.

“Many of the larger institutions are currently hiring folks from outside to move to Alaska to fill those positions,” Wahto said. “We obviously want to be able to help fill some of those positions with people who are here in Alaska.”

Surgical technologists assist surgeons in a variety of ways, including preparing the operating room, ensuring equipment is working properly and by maintaining a sterile operating environment.

A survey by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development estimates the need for surgical technologists to grow 13 percent by 2024.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAA starting surgical technology program in response to industry need – KTOO

University of Alaska – The Change Force

Our Mission:
65 by 2025

For Alaska to be the best it can be, we need our workforce to be as strong as it can be. That means by 2025, we need 65 percent of working-age Alaskans to have a postsecondary education. This will ensure that Alaskans have the qualifications required to fill the key positions needed to move our state forward. With your help, the University of Alaska will drive the change we need to secure a better future for our state. Are you in? 

Watch the video and join the force here.

Source: University of Alaska – The Change Force