Alaska Identifies Difficult to Fill Health Occupations

AK Health Care Profile

This report details the health care occupations Alaska employers reported were most difficult to fill. It also introduces new data on occupational retention and provides occupational and demographic data on the existing health care workforce to help identify why some occupations are especially difficult for employers to fill. That information is intended to inform decisions about education, training, and other workforce development efforts.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Research and Analysis Section. in partnership with UAA College of Health, UAA Alaska Center for Rural Health and Health Workforce, and Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority.

USDOT’s Maritime Administration Joins National Maritime Workforce Conference

SharedQuarters
The Maritime Administration (MARAD) was pleased to participate in the National Maritime Workforce Conference held in Texas earlier this month.

The conference brought together representatives from academia and industry professionals from across the country to focus on how to enhance and expand maritime, marine technology and port management workforce training at 2-year colleges. Representatives from technical and community colleges participated with MARAD alongside state maritime academies, universities, shipyards, port authorities and other maritime industry partners.

MARAD staff reported on the status of the United States Merchant Marine as well as offering an update on the latest news from the Maritime Administration. They also encouraged interested stakeholders to submit their comments on the docket in response to the Request for Comments on the Centers of Excellence for Domestic Maritime Workforce Training and Education (CoE) application process, which was recently published in the Federal Register. MARAD is seeking comment on the proposed applicant guide; and, after review of the comments received, will publish a further Federal Register notice setting out the application process and requesting submission of applications for designation as a CoE.

The CoE designation program was established by the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Qualified training institutions seeking to be designated as a CoE will be required to apply to MARAD. MARAD may then enter into a cooperative agreement with a designated CoE to provide federal support, as outlined in the Federal Register notice, for the CoE’s maritime workforce training and education efforts. These training and education programs will open up greater career opportunities in the United States’ maritime industry, including providing opportunities for academic credit for prior military service or other related experience.

The conference further included panel discussions on innovative workforce programs and how colleges can align themselves with the maritime industry.

Please visit www.marad.dot.gov for further information on the work of the Maritime Administration and how it is supporting improvements to workforce training across the maritime industry in the United States.

(Alaska had a delegation of ten in attendance representing the University of Alaska, Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development Alaska Vocational Technical Center, Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, and Vigor Alaska.)

Source: MARAD – By Rodney McNany

Alaska June Economic Trends

TrendsJune2018

June Trends explores household debt — what types people hold, what they mean, and how Alaska and other states compare. Also in this issue is a look at the wholesale trade industry and an update on how the recession has affected different areas of the state. Some have been hit hard while others have continued to add jobs over the last two years.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development

UA Fisheries, Seafood and Maritime Initiative Spring Update

FSMIUpdate

The University of Alaska (UA) has been collaborating with maritime industry representatives, state agencies, legislators and other training entities across the state since 2012 on the Fishing, Seafood and Maritime Initiative (FSMI). The goal of the initiative is to assess, develop and deliver training programs, raise awareness and further research to prepare Alaskans to meet current and emerging workforce, economic and scientific needs.

The FSMI Spring Update was released in May. Read the full report here.

Workforce Development: Career Readiness and the Evolving World of Work

Katrina Chertkow graduated summa cum laude from the University of Alaska Anchorage earlier this month with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. (Photo/Scott Chertkow)

Katrina Chertkow graduated from the University of Alaska Anchorage earlier this month with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. A member of the Honors College, she graduated summa cum laude, and is pursuing a master’s degree in integrated marketing and communications at Northwestern University in the fall.

Chertkow is a high achiever by any definition. And yet, her career path is uncertain.

“I’m not sure what my career options are after grad school, which avenues to take,” she said. “Should I work for a marketing agency, start my own business, or freelance?”

Cherkow’s uncertainty isn’t surprising. Students graduating this spring have watched as the number of people spending their career with one employer rapidly shrinks, and an increasing number of individuals have multiple careers in their lifetime.

The Freelancers Union says that 34 percent of the U.S. workforce — 53 million Americans — are working as freelancers. With the rise of the “gig economy” short-term employment contracts will become more common.

For those in workforce development, this raises an interesting question: How can we prepare Alaskans for an ever-evolving world of work?

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska Journal of Commerce – Workforce development: Career readiness and the evolving world of work