New Aviation Technology Director Talks About What’s on the Horizon

Paul Herrick is the director of the Aviation Technology Division at UAA. While Herrick is still new to the position, taking on the role this past January, he’s an established presence at ATD, having worked as a professor for the division for 26 years and even served periodically as interim director and associate dean. In that time, he watched the division grow into the industry pillar it is now while weathering ups and downs in the aviation industry. (Photo by James Evans / University of Alaska Anchorage)

Located a 10-minute drive north from UAA’s Main Campus and right on Merrill Field lies the Aviation Technology Center. While the historic Anchorage airport is a natural home for the university’s aviation programs, the separation can sometimes make it easy to forget about that corner of campus.

Despite the distance, the Aviation Technology Division (ATD) is anything but an aside. Housed under UAA’s Community and Technical College, ATD boasts a nearly 100 percent job placement rate for graduates from all four of its programs: aviation maintenance technology, air traffic control, professional piloting and aviation administration.

“It is unlikely that you can go to an aviation employer in this state and not find a graduate from our programs,” says Paul Herrick, UAA’s new ATD director. “The way we state it is that everyone who looks for a job, gets a job. You have to not want a job to not get one. Our students’ large presence in Alaska aviation is a legacy that we’re really proud of.”

That legacy includes a whole range of positions with small operators, regional airlines, major air carriers and even the Federal Aviation Administration.

Read the full article here.

Source: New aviation technology director talks about what’s on the horizon – Green & Gold News

Ravn Needs More Pilots and they Want them from Alaska

Many college students struggle with the balance of going to class and having to work to pay for their education. Rather than waiting until after graduation to start making money, students in the UAA Aviation Degree & Airline Pilot Employment program can now start working while finishing their education.

On Wednesday, UAA and Ravn Air Group announced the launch of a new program that allows students to simultaneously complete their aviation degree and work as regional airline pilots.  

“The uniqueness is that the pilots come to us already qualified, but they are not yet finished with their undergraduate,” Ravn Senior Vice President of Flight Operations Deke Abbott said. “So they get credit for their undergraduate degree, while at the same time earning a living as a new commercial pilot.”

The program is a win-win for Ravn and for the students, UAA Director of Aviation Technology Paul Herrick said. 

“The employment component is the different element of this, which we are really excited about,” he said. “Because students do want to get out and start making money, and start advancing their career with an actual air carrier.”

UAA’s aviation maintenance, piloting and air traffic control programs have been in place for nearly three decades and have supplied the aviation workforce in Alaska, Herrick said.

Source: Ravn needs more pilots and they want them from Alaska – KTVA

Opening Doors to Help Dreams Take Flight

By Dec. 31, 2017, of the 609,306 total piloting jobs available in the U.S, 42,694 of those were held by women, representing seven percent of the total piloting jobs in the country, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Annual U.S. Civil Airmen Statistics report. Additionally, in that report, the FAA totaled women working in aviation in non-piloting jobs — which includes everything from mechanics to dispatchers — to represent only 29.2 percent of the total jobs.

Girls in Aviation Day — an annual worldwide event hosted by Women in Aviation International (WAI) — is hoping to change these statistics and introduce young girls into the world of aviation early on, and help them discover the numerous career opportunities within the industry.

Read the full article here.

Source: Opening doors to help dreams take flight – Green & Gold News; photos courtesy of Chris LaRue

Alaska’s Emerging Sector Series: Aviation & Aerospace

Both the aviation and aerospace industries have strong roots in Alaska. With a major air cargo hub, rocket launch sites, abundant airfields and airspace, and a robust aviation culture, Alaska has competitive advantages that create opportunities for both aviation and aerospace to become even more significant drivers of Alaska’s economy.

“Alaska has more airspace without entry or clearance requirements than any other state,” said Britteny Cioni-Haywood, director of the Division of Economic Development. “We also have more pilots and registered aircraft per capita than any other state and over 750 airports. Combined with our strong history of innovation related to air transportation, Alaska provides an attractive environment for entrepreneurs to test new aviation technologies.”

The report, available on the Division of Economic Development website, explores the market and economic trends associated with the aviation and aerospace sectors in Alaska, highlights individual entrepreneurs and businesses, and identifies potential strategies to support growth in the sector.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska’s Emerging Sector: Aviation and Aerospace – Alaska Business Monthly and Alaska Division of Economic Development