Alaska’s Emerging Sector Series: Aviation & Aerospace

Both the aviation and aerospace industries have strong roots in Alaska. With a major air cargo hub, rocket launch sites, abundant airfields and airspace, and a robust aviation culture, Alaska has competitive advantages that create opportunities for both aviation and aerospace to become even more significant drivers of Alaska’s economy.

“Alaska has more airspace without entry or clearance requirements than any other state,” said Britteny Cioni-Haywood, director of the Division of Economic Development. “We also have more pilots and registered aircraft per capita than any other state and over 750 airports. Combined with our strong history of innovation related to air transportation, Alaska provides an attractive environment for entrepreneurs to test new aviation technologies.”

The report, available on the Division of Economic Development website, explores the market and economic trends associated with the aviation and aerospace sectors in Alaska, highlights individual entrepreneurs and businesses, and identifies potential strategies to support growth in the sector.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska’s Emerging Sector: Aviation and Aerospace – Alaska Business Monthly and Alaska Division of Economic Development

FAA and UAF Spark Interest in Drones at Camp

Matthew Westhoff, a pilot with UAF’s ACUASI, teaches students about drones at a camp in June. Photo by Patty Eagan.

Twenty-one middle school students built, learned how to operate and took home their own small unmanned aircraft at a camp taught by pilots and engineers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute the week of June 11-15.

The camp, funded by the Federal Aviation Administration, uses unmanned aircraft to encourage kids to pursue science, technology, engineering and math-related education and careers.

Pilots and engineers from UAF’s Alaska Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration instructed the students through a combination of engineering, flying and interacting with simulators. The students spent the week building their own unmanned aircraft, piece by piece, and flying them. They listened to presentations from industry guest speakers and learned about topics like no-fly zones and the importance of registration.

The goal was for kids to leave with technical skills and a well-rounded knowledge of not only the UAS industry but also FAA safety rules and other requirements.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska Native News