Smoke and Gears

Greg Perez, a diesel power technology student, works on an engine during a fall 2017 class. (Photo by James Evans / University of Alaska Anchorage)

For the past three semesters, diesel power technology students have been busy fixing a donated fire engine in the UAA garage. So while some students claim their class projects are life-or-death, this one actually qualifies.

“Every piece has to work together perfectly or else you have a catastrophic failure,” said Ben Stewart, a diesel student who worked on the fire engine.

The stakes are high because the donated truck will return to service with the Seldovia Volunteer Fire Department. It’s a beneficial partnership: students gain valuable experience, while a small community gains a valuable emergency vehicle.

“These are great real-world projects for our students,” noted Darrin Marshall, director of the Department of Automotive and Diesel Technology.

The engine in question originally served the Anchorage Fire Department until it overheated at a rescue call. Department mechanics determined that, in a city with nearly 300,000 tax payers, it was better to replace the older engine than repair it. A community like Seldovia, though, with 0.1 percent of Anchorage’s population, would really benefit from a donation like this.

Read the full article here.

Source: Smoke and gears – Green & Gold News

Opportunities in ESSA for College in High School Programs

College in high school programs, such as dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, and early college high school, are effective and increasingly popular models for improving student access, affordability, and completion of college, particularly for students who are low income or underrepresented in higher education.

Students who attend schools with high-quality college in high school programs are more likely to graduate high school, immediately enroll in college, and persist to completion than their peers. At the same time, these models provide students with significant flexibility in how to tailor their academic programs to their specific needs. They also meet a top priority of many families: reducing the time and cost for students to earn degrees and enter the workforce.

ESSA empowers states and local decision makers to implement the strategies they choose for improving teaching and learning, provided that they are grounded in evidence of success. ESSA encourages states and school districts to consider college in high school programs as key strategies for successfully preparing students for college, and provides increased access to federal funding for the development and implementation of these programs.

Working with our partners at the College in High School Alliance (CHSA), a coalition of national and state organizations advocating on behalf of high-quality dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, and early college high schools, we have put together a fact sheet for school district leaders to understand:

How ESSA treats college in high school programs;

What funding opportunities are available under the law for you to consider using; and

How states are prioritizing these programs in their accountability systems.

CHSA is a coalition of national and state organizations collaborating to positively impact policies and build broad support for programs that enable high school students – particularly those who are low income or underrepresented in higher education – to enroll in authentic, affordable college pathways toward postsecondary degrees and credentials offered with appropriate support.

CHSA has additional resources available should you wish to learn more, including a State Policy Guide  implementing these programs under ESSA and a deep dive ESSA State-by-State Analysis of how states talked about these programs in their state plans.

More information about CHSA, including how to get in touch any questions about using ESSA to support college in high school programs in your state, can be found here.

Source: AASA – The School Superintendents Association Blog

2018 Alaska CTE Plan Addendum Released

View or download the CTE Plan Addendum here.

The 2018 CTE Plan Addendum was released.  A product of the Alaska Workforce Investment Board’s CTE Plan Working Group, the addendum seeks to re-energize the conversation around CTE and provide an advocacy tool to help ensure that CTE opportunities are available and communicated to Alaskans. 

Learn more about the Alaska CTE Plan at: http://www.alaskacteplan.com/.

Alaska ACTE Honors Excellence in Career and Technical Education

AlaskaACTEThe Alaska Association for Career and Technical Education celebrated 13 outstanding Alaskan educators, workforce development champions, and business and community leaders with awards at their October 2018 state conference in Anchorage.

  1. Outstanding CTE Teacher of the Year: Chris Taylor, Mat-Su Career Tech High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Outstanding NEW CTE Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Business Education Compact: Vanessa Forbes, King Tech High School, Anchorage School District
  1. Business/Information Technology Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Business Week: Ken Werner, Alaska Vocational Technical Education Center
  1. Industrial/Technology Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Construction Industry Progress Fund: Peter Daley, Hutchison High School, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District
  1. Health Sciences Teacher of the Year: Kelly Woolcott, Mat-Su Career Tech High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Hospitality/Tourism Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska CHARR: Melinda Dooley, Service High School, Anchorage School District
  1. STEM Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Resource Education: John Notestine, Wasilla High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. CTE Administrator of the Year: Jon Clouse, Southwest Region School District
  1. Promising Practices Award, sponsored by Andrews Auctions, Appraisals and Professional Services: Christel Mozaelevskiy, Redington High School, Educators Rising Program, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Leadership Award, sponsored by LeCompte Consulting: Marcia Olson, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  1. Lifetime Achievement Award, sponsored by Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium: Fred Villa, Workforce Development, University of Alaska
  1. Community Contribution Award: John Plutt, Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 375, Fairbanks
  1. Community Contribution Award: Gloria Burnett, Alaska Center for Rural Health and Health Workforce/Alaska Health Education Consortium

Source: Alaska Association for Career and Technical Education

Alaska Workforce Investment Board Seeks Outstanding Partners in Workforce Development

ANCHORAGE, AK— The Alaska Workforce Investment Board (AWIB) is now accepting nominations for the David G. Stone Award, which recognizes outstanding partners in workforce development. Employers, K-12 Career and Technical Education instructors and administrators, and Postsecondary Career and Technical Education instructors and administrators are eligible for this award in honor of Mr. Stone, a distinguished public servant dedicated to workforce development and Alaska hire.

The Board will grant awards in three categories:

  1. K-12 Career and Technical Education Instructor/Administrator of the Year Award
    Individuals employed as classroom/laboratory instructors or administrators in a K-12 vocational technical career education program are eligible recipients for this award.
  2. Postsecondary Career and Technical Education Instructor/Administrator of the Year Award
    Individuals employed as classroom/laboratory instructors or administrators including training coordinators and training directors in a postsecondary training, career and technical education program or apprenticeship are eligible for this award.
  3. Employer of the Year Award
    Nominees must be an employer providing jobs to Alaskans. The employer must demonstrate support for the public workforce system.

Mr. Stone served as the Department of Labor and Workforce Development deputy commissioner, as vice-chair of the AWIB for many years, and deputy mayor to the Juneau Assembly. He was a hard-working leader who helped establish mine training programs throughout Alaska, and served in various capacities for the Southeast Conference, Alaska Municipal League, and Alaska Miners Association.

Nominations are open until midnight, January 4, 2019. For eligibility information and nomination forms, visit the AWIB website: http://labor.alaska.gov/awib.

For additional information about the awards or the nomination process, please contact Louise Dean, AWIB Executive Director, at 907-269-7487 or Louise.Dean@alaska.gov.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development