DEED/CTE Announces Two Competitive Grant Opportunities

Postsecondary Grant RFP

Perkins postsecondary grants will deliver high-quality CTE programs focusing on either direct instruction of secondary students in postsecondary coursework or professional development of CTE instructors in one of nine priority workforce areas identified by the Alaska Workforce Investment Board.  Grants will prioritize offering multiple entry and exit points, including stackable courses and/or credentials for maximum participation and effect.

Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), Local Educational Authorities (LEAs) offering postsecondary instruction, technical schools offering postsecondary instruction, and consortia offering postsecondary instruction are eligible to apply.  Grants awards will be between $50,000 and $150,000 per year for up to three (3) years.  For more information, download the RFP here.  Proposals are due to DEED/CTE by 4pm on April 26, 2019.

Non-Traditional Occupations Grant RFP

Non-Traditional Occupations (NTO) grants improve gender equity and representation in targeted occupational fields important to the current and future state economy.  Grants are expected to increase equitable gender participation and facilitate smooth transitions from secondary education, through postsecondary training, and into the workforce.

LEAs and consortia of LEAs are eligible to apply.  Grants awards will be between $20,000 and $30,000 per year for up to three (3) years.  For more information, download the RFP here.  Proposals are due to DEED/CTE by 4pm on April 26, 2019.

February is CTE Month®

What is CTE?

Career and technical education, or CTE, is education that directly prepares students for high-wage, high-demand careers. CTE covers many different fields, including health care, information technology, advanced manufacturing, hospitality and management and many more, as described in the national Career Clusters® and ACTE’s What is CTE? page and Sector Sheets. CTE encompasses many different types of education, from classroom learning to certification programs to work-based learning opportunities outside the classroom.

What is CTE Month? 

Career and Technical Education Month®, or CTE Month®, is a public awareness campaign that takes place each February to celebrate the value of CTE and the achievements and accomplishments of CTE programs across the country.

What can I do to celebrate CTE Month?

See Alaska Governor’s Proclamation here.

Source: CTE Month® | ACTE

Smoke and Gears

Greg Perez, a diesel power technology student, works on an engine during a fall 2017 class. (Photo by James Evans / University of Alaska Anchorage)

For the past three semesters, diesel power technology students have been busy fixing a donated fire engine in the UAA garage. So while some students claim their class projects are life-or-death, this one actually qualifies.

“Every piece has to work together perfectly or else you have a catastrophic failure,” said Ben Stewart, a diesel student who worked on the fire engine.

The stakes are high because the donated truck will return to service with the Seldovia Volunteer Fire Department. It’s a beneficial partnership: students gain valuable experience, while a small community gains a valuable emergency vehicle.

“These are great real-world projects for our students,” noted Darrin Marshall, director of the Department of Automotive and Diesel Technology.

The engine in question originally served the Anchorage Fire Department until it overheated at a rescue call. Department mechanics determined that, in a city with nearly 300,000 tax payers, it was better to replace the older engine than repair it. A community like Seldovia, though, with 0.1 percent of Anchorage’s population, would really benefit from a donation like this.

Read the full article here.

Source: Smoke and gears – Green & Gold News

Opportunities in ESSA for College in High School Programs

College in high school programs, such as dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, and early college high school, are effective and increasingly popular models for improving student access, affordability, and completion of college, particularly for students who are low income or underrepresented in higher education.

Students who attend schools with high-quality college in high school programs are more likely to graduate high school, immediately enroll in college, and persist to completion than their peers. At the same time, these models provide students with significant flexibility in how to tailor their academic programs to their specific needs. They also meet a top priority of many families: reducing the time and cost for students to earn degrees and enter the workforce.

ESSA empowers states and local decision makers to implement the strategies they choose for improving teaching and learning, provided that they are grounded in evidence of success. ESSA encourages states and school districts to consider college in high school programs as key strategies for successfully preparing students for college, and provides increased access to federal funding for the development and implementation of these programs.

Working with our partners at the College in High School Alliance (CHSA), a coalition of national and state organizations advocating on behalf of high-quality dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, and early college high schools, we have put together a fact sheet for school district leaders to understand:

How ESSA treats college in high school programs;

What funding opportunities are available under the law for you to consider using; and

How states are prioritizing these programs in their accountability systems.

CHSA is a coalition of national and state organizations collaborating to positively impact policies and build broad support for programs that enable high school students – particularly those who are low income or underrepresented in higher education – to enroll in authentic, affordable college pathways toward postsecondary degrees and credentials offered with appropriate support.

CHSA has additional resources available should you wish to learn more, including a State Policy Guide  implementing these programs under ESSA and a deep dive ESSA State-by-State Analysis of how states talked about these programs in their state plans.

More information about CHSA, including how to get in touch any questions about using ESSA to support college in high school programs in your state, can be found here.

Source: AASA – The School Superintendents Association Blog