Career and Technical Education Month

Governor Walker recently announced February as Career and Technical Education Month. You can find the announcement here.

WHEREAS, Career and Technical Education (CTE) affords students the chance to gain the academic foundation and the technical skills necessary for true career readiness; and

WHEREAS, the genuine experiences and career exploration prospects provided by CTE programs enable students early on to make knowledgeable decisions about their academic and career pathways; and

WHEREAS, CTE prepares students for fulfilling careers by offering programs of study that link secondary and postsecondary education and lead to the attainment of industry-recognized qualifications; and

WHEREAS, the Alaska Departments of Education and Early Development, Labor and Workforce Development, and the University of Alaska system continue to jointly implement the statewide CTE plan to ensure a complete and consistent career and technical education system for Alaska; and

WHEREAS, ensuring Alaskan employers have access to a qualified workforce is an important part in guaranteeing productivity within business and industry as well as continuous Alaskan economic growth and global competitiveness.

NOW THEREFORE, I, Bill Walker, GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF ALASKA, do hereby proclaim February 2018, as:

Career and Technical Education Month

in Alaska, and urge all citizens to become familiar with the services and benefits offered by the CTE programs in Alaska and to support and participate in these programs.

Source: Office of the Governor

 

CTE on the Frontier: Providing Learners Access to Diverse Career Pathways

Rural communities all too often face scarce funding, instructors and facilities, forcing institutions to choose between offering a variety of introductory courses across a breadth of subjects or providing more narrowly focused, sequenced programs within one or two priority Career Clusters. Providing learners access to diverse career pathways in rural areas is a persistent challenge for all states.

This brief from Advance CTE is the third installment in the CTE on the Frontier series, designed to help states identify promising strategies for expanding the variety of career pathways available in rural areas. The brief profiles how states such as Nebraska, Alaska, North Dakota and Idaho have leveraged strategic partnerships and new technologies to reach economies of scale and offer a wider breadth of career pathways to rural learners.

Other briefs in the CTE on the Frontier series include:

CTE on the Frontier: Providing Learners Access to Diverse Career Pathways was developed through the New Skills for Youth initiative, a partnership of the Council of Chief State School Officers, Advance CTE and the Education Strategy Group, generously funded by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Source: Advance CTE

 

Governor Walker Holds Bill Signing and Cabinet Meeting in Bethel

BETHEL — Governor Bill Walker signed legislation to help build a Stronger Alaska, and convened his cabinet in Bethel to discuss rural access and support issues. Governor Walker, Lieutenant Governor Byron Mallott, and the Cabinet also hosted a community reception for Bethel residents.

“I’m very pleased Lt. Governor Mallott, our commissioners, and I had the chance to engage with students in Bethel today and hear residents’ concerns,” Governor Walker said. “Convening the Cabinet in Bethel has been a goal of mine, and I thank the community for the warm reception. Hearing from Alaskans across the state keeps us all engaged and grounded, and equips us to continue pulling together for our state.”

House Bill 141, sponsored by Representative Zach Fansler (D-Bethel), authorizes the Alaska Workforce Investment Board to continue making allocations to the Alaska Technical and Vocational Education Program (TVEP) through June 30, 2020. In 2016, ten institutions serving over 10,000 Alaskans received TVEP funding. TVEP programs enhance the accessibility and quality of job training available to Alaskans statewide, and align the training with regional workforce demands.

Read the full article here.

Source: Governor Walker Holds Bill Signing and Cabinet Meeting in Bethel – Office of the Governor

Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology

Heavy diesel technology is a profession that keeps boats, bulldozers, semi trucks and cranes running year-round.

Diesel mechanics begin earning $18 to $30 an hour to well over $100,000 a year, depending on experience.

Mechanics should have clean driving records, be able to pass a drug test and be willing to learn as technology continues to grow.

The University of Alaska Anchorage has a diesel power technology program that offers a one-year undergraduate certificate and a two-year associate degree. Jeff Libby, the director of the division, says it’s a field with a lot of potential for growth.

“We have jobs in the maritime industry, with the seafood processing industry, and construction, mining, trucking industry is pretty supportive of us,” he said. “And our program is NATEF accredited, the National Automotive Technology Education Foundation, the only one in Alaska that has the accreditation. It’s a big deal.”

Libby says they’ve seen a 20 percent increase in enrollment in the past two years, due to the job demand and pay.

To find out who’s hiring, watch the video above or contact the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium on its website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology » KTVA 11