Kinzea Jones honored as 2018 Interior Region EMS Educator of the Year

Jim Siddall, one of the owner/operators of the clinic at Clear Air Force Station and Canyon Clinic at Denali, with his employee Kinzea Jones, the 2018 EMS Educator of the Year. Photo Courtesy Kinzea Jones.

FAIRBANKS — Lifelong Fairbanksan Kinzea Jones is the 2018 Interior Region EMS Educator of the Year.

This award is given to the educator who displays initiative, leadership and dedication to emergency medical services training and helps to improve the Interior Alaska EMS system.

Every year, the Interior Region EMS Council recognizes individuals who have performed their services in a special way. The council also recognized Nenana Fire Chief Joe Forness as Provider of the Year and Chalkyitsik Emergency Trauma Technicians Team as the Service of the Year.

Read the full article here.

Source: Kinzea Jones honored as 2018 Interior Region EMS Educator of the Year – Daily News Minor

 

Perseverance Led to Degree for Kotzebue Nurse

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Scott West stands with his wife, Flor Maria, his son, Benjamin, and his daughter, Leah. – Courtesy of Scott West

Last year, five students graduated from the University of Alaska Anchorage’s distance-learning nursing program through the Chukchi Campus. Scott West, 29, of Kotzebue, was one of them. His passion for nursing runs deep; he’s always appreciated the field and was inspired to enter it after he found himself facing an emergency situation with little access to help. The Sounder spoke with West about his career path.

Read the interview here.

Source: Perseverance led to degree for Kotzebue nurse – The Arctic Sounder

Kotzebue Woman Earns Nursing Degree

Last month, Kotzebue’s Savannah Saġainiq Jones, 21, became one of the region’s newest registered nurses. She, along with four other students, including fellow Kotzebue resident Tiffany Scott, earned her associate’s degree in nursing from the University of Alaska Anchorage and was recognized at a ceremony.

Read the interview with Jones about her academic achievement and hopes for the future.

 

Source: Kotzebue woman earns nursing degree – The Arctic Sounder

How Do You Recruit More Young Alaska Native Nurses? Start By Giving Them A Stethoscope.

More and more programs have sprung up locally to familiarize students with trades and professions in the hopes of getting more Alaska Natives employed.

That’s what the University of Alaska Anchorage did 20 years ago for Alaska Native nurses. The program is called RRANN: Recruiting and Retaining Alaska Natives into Nursing. In December, RRANN held a camp in Bethel for high schoolers to show them how they, too, can enter the field.

Read the full article here.

Source: KYUK Public Media – How Do You Recruit More Young Alaska Native Nurses? Start By Giving Them A Stethoscope.

Associate to Bachelor’s: UAA’s School of Nursing is Answering Kodiak’s Health Care Needs

UAA’s School of Nursing is undergoing a two-year expansion project, with the Kodiak Outreach Site next on the list. Associate Professor Margie Mete has been charged with transitioning the site’s associate program to a bachelor’s program.

Read the full article here.

Source: Associate to bachelor’s: UAA’s School of Nursing is answering Kodiak’s health care needs – Green & Gold News