Alaska Workforce Investment Board Endorses Gasline Workforce Plan

AKLNGPlansJUNEAU, Alaska — The Alaska Workforce Investment Board (AWIB) unanimously approved a resolution in support of the Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s Alaska LNG Project Gasline Workforce Plan. The Alaska LNG project will create thousands of jobs, and the department’s workforce plan aims to align existing resources and identify opportunities to build training capacity to maximize Alaska hire on the gasline.

The Alaska LNG project, led by the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, will move 20 million tons of natural gas each year from Alaska’s North Slope to tidewater, where it will be liquefied and shipped by sea to Asian markets. Offtake points along the 807-mile pipeline will ensure Alaskans have access to natural gas for in-state use before it is sold to other markets. Construction is anticipated to begin in 2019, with gas delivered by 2024-2025.

“Construction and operation of the gasline will create up to 20,000 jobs and Alaskans should be first in line for these opportunities,” said Labor Commissioner Heidi Drygas. “This workforce development plan will guide efforts to ensure Alaskans can gain the skills and experience they need to build the Alaska LNG project.”

“The Alaska Workforce Investment Board works to connect Alaskans with good jobs,” said AWIB Chair Larry Bell. “We strongly endorse this workforce plan and look forward to working with other stakeholders to prioritize Alaska hire on the gasline.”

The department held public meetings in Fairbanks, Anchorage, and Kenai to solicit input for the gasline workforce plan. The plan calls for the formation of a leadership committee to draw from the expertise of business and industry, organized labor, educators, and training organizations. The committee will include representatives from the Department of Labor and Workforce Development, the University of Alaska, the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, the Department of Education and Early Development, and the AWIB. The leadership committee will develop policy and resource recommendations to prioritize education and training for the in demand occupations associated with the Alaska LNG project.

View the original press release at http://labor.alaska.gov/news/2018/news18-17.pdf

Workforce Wednesday: Construction Apprenticeships


This week on Workforce Wednesday, a look at the four apprenticeships available in the field of construction, and how you can get started.

The four types of apprenticeships we are looking at this week include carpentry, millwright work, scaffold building, and pile driving.

An entry-level apprenticeship can net around a base pay of $23 an hour. That includes $10 an hour into retirement and about $10 an hour for health benefits. Those amounts increase as you advance within the program.

Requirements for starting an apprenticeship include being over 18 years of age, having a high school diploma or equivalent, having a valid driver’s license, being an Alaskan resident and passing a drug test.

Applicants are being accepted through January of 2018 to start work in May and April.

Source: KTVA Workforce Wednesday: Construction apprenticeships

Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy

The Alaska Military Youth Academy is helping at‑risk kids get the skills they need to succeed and become job-ready.

The academy is a restart program for at‑risk youth: students who have either dropped out of high school or are in jeopardy of not graduating. Cadets live on their campus for 22 weeks, where they can earn their GED. AMYA is an accredited high school that can also teach them important job skills.

The pre‑apprenticeship program is a grant-funded four-week part of the AMYA program that trains youth, in partnership with unions, in four common construction trades. They also can train in the culinary arts and health‑related services. Before they begin formal training, students receive safety and OSHA certifications, along with scaffold building certification required in most trades.

Employability skills are embedded in everything AMYA teaches, so employers know that graduates are equipped with all of the skills necessary to be successful on the job.

Applicants must be between 16 and 18 years old and need a high-school education. To apply, visit AMYA online.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Healthcare Apprenticeships

Four new health care apprenticeships are now available through the Alaska Primary Care Association.

They include:

  • Certified Community Health Worker – 1-year program or 6 months with experience
  • Certified Billing and Coding Specialist – 1-year program or 6 months with experience
  • Certified Clinical Medical Assistant- 2-year program or 1 year with experience
  • Certified Medical Admin Assistant- 1-year program or 6 months with experience

Classes are conducted online, so, you can “earn while you learn” in your respective community.

Cherise Fowler with the Alaska Primary Care Association said the health care field is projected to grow this year.

“We work with a huge array of community health centers throughout rural Alaska. We noted they don’t always have access to education and post-secondary education for their fields, so we wanted to deliver related technical instruction through the internet to them throughout Alaska,” said Fowler.

Pay during the apprenticeship varies by employer, but is typically a percentage of what a non-apprenticed employee would make. According to the Alaska Primary Care Association, this is how much you can expect to earn, on average, in each profession:

  • Community Health Worker: $24 hourly
  • Certified Billing and Coding Specialist: $21 hourly
  • Certified Clinical Medical Assistant: $19 hourly
  • Certified Medical Admin Assistant or front desk: $18 hourly

To find out if you’re eligible for one of those four apprenticeship programs, click here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Healthcare apprenticeships » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Fabrication

Careers in fabrication involve taking raw materials and making something useful out of them. One example is making control systems for the oil and gas industry. Alaskans who are interested can also expect a decent salary.

Lynn Johnson, a director with Dowland Bach, says entry level welders start out at around $44,000 a year and can make up to $101,000. General fabricators make about the same, and engineers start at $70,000 and can make up to $162,000 a year.

Johnson said the type of person he looks for has to have a general aptitude for mechanical work and an excellent work ethic. He added that kind of person should also expect to go home at the end of the day proud that they built something with their hands. Johnson mentioned in the past 40 years he’s been proud to see the various things his company has built around Anchorage.

Martha Peck, with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, says Alaskans can get training in-state. The Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center (NACTEC) in Nome is a good place to start. Another is getting an apprenticeship with the Sheet Metal Workers Local 23 Union.

For a list of companies hiring or more information, you can head to APICC.org.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Careers in fabrication » KTVA 11