Sen. Lisa Murkowski visits University of Alaska maritime training center

Sen. Murkowski tours UAS Ketchikan Maritime Center Welding Lab.

Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski last month toured the University of Alaska Southeast Maritime Training Center, which has been training mariners for more than 30 years, in support of the maritime industry.

The center is located on the water in Ketchikan and includes a welding lab, navigation simulator, and diesel and electronics labs.

Murkowski expressed support for Alaska’s maritime industry when she visited, thanking faculty members for providing “valuable training opportunities for Alaskans,” the university said in a statement.

With more than 70,000 workers in the state’s maritime industry, nearly all Alaskans depend in some way on the maritime economy, the senator said.

The state is highly dependent on shipping for imports of food and other goods, as well as exports for oil, seafood and minerals.

Alaska’s economy is also dependent upon water transportation, bringing visitors on cruise ships, managing ports and harbors, traveling on the Alaska Marine Highway ferry system, and maintaining the equipment and machinery essential to villages, towns and cities.

Through the Maritime Training Center, students can advance from deckhand to third mate, preparing to handle responsibilities of limited-tonnage vessels and take on duties of an officer or owner.

The Qualified Member of the Engine Department credential offers students additional opportunities to advance in the maritime industry.

‘Dual Enrollment in Alaska’ Analysis Shows Progress and Supports Next Steps

Dual enrollment programs provide access to college-level courses to high school students prior to graduation, often helping students become more successful in high school and easing their path to college. Between 2008 and 2017, University of Alaska (UA) dual enrollment programs experienced an 85 percent increase in student enrollment and, among those who graduated from high school, 41 percent went on to attend a UA institution within a year.

The new report, Dual Enrollment in Alaska: A 10-year retrospective and outcome analysis, by Dayna DeFeo, director of ISER’s Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, and Trang Tran, ISER Research Professional, looks at 10 years of UA enrollment records for dual enrollment (DE) offerings and includes 15,473 students who attended Alaska public neighborhood schools. The study provides an overview of dual enrollment – including types of programs, participation, and performance – and highlights opportunities to build on the current successes.

Source: ‘Dual Enrollment in Alaska’ analysis shows progress and supports next steps – Green & Gold News

UAS Student Becomes First to Benefit from Coast Guard Scholarship Program

Logan Holt, 21, a business major at the University of Alaska Southeast, is sworn into the U.S. Coast Guard by Rear Admiral Matthew Bell Jr., commander of the 17th Coast Guard District, at UAS on Tuesday, April 9, 2019. Holt is the first recruit from UAS to be accepted into the Coast Guard’s College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative program. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

It took a mad dash, but Logan Holt is the first-ever University of Alaska student to be part of a new Coast Guard scholarship program at the university.

Holt, 21, formerly a home-schooled student, officially signed paperwork to be a recipient of the U.S. Coast Guard College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative Tuesday afternoon during a swearing-in ceremony at UAS.

“It was kind of a scramble and a last-minute deal,” Holt said of his application process. “By the time I finally found out about the deadline to the time the application had to be in, I think I had eight days. This will be an exciting journey.”

Holt thanked the Coast Guard and UAS for the opportunity during the ceremony and afterward said it generally takes months to apply for programs like CSPI.

CSPI is a scholarship program meant for students between the ages of 19 and 28 with at least a 2.5 grade-point average in their sophomore or junior years of undergraduate studies, according to the UAS website.

Per the website: The program offers up to two years of paid tuition, books and fees, approximately a $3,600 monthly salary as a Coast Guard active-duty member while attending classes as a full-time student and a guaranteed job after graduation with a starting salary of about $60,000 upon graduation and completion of Officer Candidate School.

Read the full article here.

Source: Getting a ride on a Coast Guard ‘ship | Juneau Empire

University of Alaska Southeast, Dual Enrollment and Career Pathways in High Schools!

Let’s face it; many high school faculty members are overloaded with teaching core courses, so the thought of adding new curricula often brings a cringe to their faces and the beginnings of a migraine headache. What if high schools could offer new and exciting coursework without the cringing or the headaches? What if high school faculty didn’t even need to teach the content? What if all the resources (lectures, reading assignments, exams, etc.) were already available? What if students could take courses for both high school and college credit? What if it didn’t cost students money?

In spring 2017, the UAS Fisheries Technology program reinvented a way to offer courses that are:

  1. Engaging and technology-based,
  2. Use the latest educational pedagogy, and
  3. Can be delivered directly into the high school classroom with no internet required.

These courses were initially created for distribution on university supplied Apple iPads, but have since been finding their ways into many high schools throughout the state. Imagine “beaming” a college instructor directly into a high school classroom where the on-site high school faculty member is doing little more than facilitating progress through the course and fostering discussion points.

Read the full article here.

Source: Association of Alaska School Boards

Skilled Workers: The Backbone of Our Communities and Our Economy

Photo courtesy of UAF Community and Technical College

Throughout the course of our daily lives we depend on the skills and services of others. From bookkeepers, nursing aides, and security personnel to welders, small engine repair, and heavy equipment mechanics, Alaska thrives when there is a dedicated workforce that serves our communities.

You may be surprised to learn that these jobs require some form of post-secondary training, which can be earned through the University of Alaska (UA), now at a reduced tuition rate.

UA is cutting tuition on select occupational programs and career and technical education (CTE) courses by 25 percent. The discount applies to 50 programs and more than 300 courses at all three universities including community campuses. Eligible programs range from pharmacy technology to welding and mine mechanics; many courses can be taken online to accommodate employed Alaskans looking to refresh skills or embark on a new career.

The university is the No. 1 provider of workforce development programs in the state, and training a skilled workforce to meet the state’s needs is one of UA’s top goals. While UA’s tuition is low compared to peer universities in the western United States, its tuition for CTE programs has been considered to be high compared to community college systems Outside.

Read the full article here.

Source: Michele Stalder – Alaska Business Magazine