Workforce Wednesday: Software Development

Software developers can solve all sorts of real world problems — from timing the Iron Dog race, to how the Alaska Department of Fish and Game collects data.

Geoff Wright, president of Pango Technology in Anchorage, says developers help build software that impacts how oil moves through our pipeline, or to the maintenance of cell towers. He said Pango is currently working with the Division of Motor Vehicles to improve its testing.

Wright said, for instance, Pango helped to make software that replaced the manual timing of the Iron Dog snow machine race. Another example is working with the Department of Fish and Game to replace its old pen and paper system of counting fish, to a smartphone based system. Under the new system a fish could be logged as soon as it’s caught and reported back the state biologist.

Pango typically recruits from the University of Alaska Anchorage. Wright mentioned the company has an active apprenticeship program that has worked out very well for them. The company tries to get the students as soon as they graduate.

Cassie Ostrander with the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium said starting out, people can make around $4,000 a month. The wage can go as high as $9,000 a month with more experience. Ostrander added that Pango is hiring, as well as GCI, KTVA’s parent company, and the Municipality of Anchorage.

For more information, head to either APICC’s or Pango Technology’s website.

Watch this Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Software development » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science

There are more than 2 million images of Alaska dating back to the 1930s, all used to monitor changes due to climate, earthquakes, volcanoes and coastal erosion, according to Stephen Sparks, an imaging specialist with Quantum Spatial.

“We can look at things like how Turnagain neighborhood changed after the 1964 earthquake or how a community like Utquiagvik, formerly Barrow, has changed over time,” Sparks said. “[There are] many, many uses for the photography.”

This type of high-tech imaging and mapping is called geospatial science, and nearly every industry in Alaska uses these types of services in one form or another, according to Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC).

“Different industries that might be looking at this are in oil and gas, timber industries, federal and local state agencies to do local neighborhood mapping,” Carty said.

There are several career opportunities in geospatial science and services. Quantum Spatial, a geospatial data company in Anchorage, hires people who are pilots, aircraft mechanics, sensor operators, geologists, chemists foresters and computer programmers.

“We work a lot with oil and gas companies,” said Adam McCullough, development director with Quantum. “We will map their pipeline infrastructure and kind of model how it’s changing over time. So we can help them direct where they want to focus maintenance and repairs.”

A person starting an internship in geospatial science can earn about $15 an hour. Typically, once a person has gained experience, they earn upwards of $25 to $30 an hour, says Carty.

To see which companies are hiring, head to APICC’s website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science | KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Opportunities within the Municipality of Anchorage


The Municipality of Anchorage is hosting a free “job shop” aimed at supporting residents looking for employment. The program started in Mountain View and has expanded to the Z.J. Loussac Public Library. The job shops are part of Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz’s goal to create employment opportunities and be innovative in Alaska’s uncertain economic times.

“If you look at the bones of the Alaska economy, we are strong, still a resource development state, there is still plenty of opportunity,” Berkowitz said Wednesday.

There are hundreds of jobs that the Municipality offers, from information technology to law enforcement, maintenance and more. One city department that’s “in full growth mode,” according to the mayor, is the police department. Berkowitz has pushed for the department’s growth, which he now says has nearly 420 officers. An academy is set to start this summer.

A full list of Anchorage Municipality jobs can be found at the city’s website. More information can be found at the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium’s website.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Opportunities within the Municipality of Anchorage | KTVA 11

UAA Community and Technical College Highlights Programs and Students in Video

The University of Alaska Anchorage Community & Technical College (CTC) offers career and technical education programs that are closely aligned with Alaska’s core industries. CTC faculty work with industry professionals to develop relevant, hands-on training for students. Our graduates earn good wages in high-demand fields that allow them to support themselves, their families and contribute to the state’s economy.

Industries We Serve

  • Automotive
  • Aviation
  • Construction and Design
  • Culinary, Hospitality and Tourism
  • Information Technology
  • Occupational Safety and Health
  • Oil and Gas

The college delivers innovative instructional services that support student success. Through continuing education, CTC engages the community and provides opportunities for personal enrichment and professional growth.

Source: UAA Community and Technical College

Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Information Technology


On this Workforce Wednesday, Daybreak looked at careers in information technology, better known as IT.

Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium and retired APD Detective Glen Klinkhart discussed how widespread the career is how much it pays.

“IT is everywhere,” Klinkhart said, “I mean, from a mom and pop shop that uses the Square and QuickBooks to do all of their accounting to large corporations that are running everything. It is a growth industry.”

Click here to watch the video and learn more.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Careers in information technology | KTVA 11 News | The Voice of Alaska