Alaska February Economic Trends

TrendsFeb2018February Trends profiles the large workforce in the oil fields on the North Slope and their historical ups and downs. Also this month Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development explains how federal estimates, posted on their website, incorrectly showed Alaska was beginning to add jobs again and explain why this data set has become less reliable for Alaska’s uses than it was in the past. More reliable data show that Alaska’s job loss continued at least through September of 2017, and likely through the end of the year.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development

Workforce Wednesday: Drilling – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Drilling is one of the most in-demand career paths in Alaska today. It requires a lot of work, and long hours, but the payoff is beneficial not only as far as a paycheck is concerned, but in the way it can make you feel as though you’ve dug your boots in the ground and put real work in.

Jon McVay, vice president of Brice Civil Constructors, expressed how he believed an ideal candidate for work in the drilling industry should be someone with strong work ethic, and who is willing to spend potentially long stretches away from home to work.

If someone were to be interested in pursuing a career in drilling, McVay recommends going through Mining and Petroleum Training Services for training. Aside from the education in the field a person would receive there, McVay stated that the training service could help the trainee get established in a network of workers in the field, which could help the candidate get established in a position.

Once training was acquired, it was recommended that the candidate pursue a job as a driller’s assistant to begin their career right in the field.

The range of pay varies from $15 an hour, all the way up to $30 an hour for full-time drillers. The hours can range from 72 to 84 hours a week, with 12-hour days.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Drilling – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology

Heavy diesel technology is a profession that keeps boats, bulldozers, semi trucks and cranes running year-round.

Diesel mechanics begin earning $18 to $30 an hour to well over $100,000 a year, depending on experience.

Mechanics should have clean driving records, be able to pass a drug test and be willing to learn as technology continues to grow.

The University of Alaska Anchorage has a diesel power technology program that offers a one-year undergraduate certificate and a two-year associate degree. Jeff Libby, the director of the division, says it’s a field with a lot of potential for growth.

“We have jobs in the maritime industry, with the seafood processing industry, and construction, mining, trucking industry is pretty supportive of us,” he said. “And our program is NATEF accredited, the National Automotive Technology Education Foundation, the only one in Alaska that has the accreditation. It’s a big deal.”

Libby says they’ve seen a 20 percent increase in enrollment in the past two years, due to the job demand and pay.

To find out who’s hiring, watch the video above or contact the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium on its website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology » KTVA 11

KPC Teams Garner Silver and Bronze Medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition

Kenai Peninsula College teams finished second and third in the 2017 National Troubleshooting Competition, April 21-22 at Lone Star College in Atascocita, Tex. The team from the Kenai River Campus (KRC) earned second place, while the Anchorage Extension Site (AES) team finished third. Last year, AES took second place and KRC placed third.

In March, 29 teams from across the country competed for the right to go to nationals. Those teams were narrowed down to eight, and two 3-person teams from AES and KRC advanced from that qualifying round.

Read the full article here.

Source: KPC teams garner silver and bronze medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition – Green & Gold News

Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy


For many Native American students, college seems as far off as the moon. But as Buzz Aldrin said in an appearance at the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program, “Once you set your mind to get something done, seemingly anything is possible.”

ANSEP has been boosting students to university and beyond since 1995, with a plan that begins in middle school and extends into career placement after graduation. This series of intensive academic supports centered at the University of Alaska Anchorage inspires students to explore science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

As of 2016, roughly 2,000 students have taken part in the program, which has over 100 partners in the form of philanthropic organizations, corporations, educational institutions, and government agencies. It helps Natives prepare for careers within the oil and gas industry, biology, conservation, and other technical fields. The Urban Institute has categorized ANSEP as one of the most successful STEM programs in the country, propelling 85 percent of graduates to STEM careers.

Read the full article here.

Source: Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy | The Philanthropy Roundtable