KPC Teams Garner Silver and Bronze Medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition

Kenai Peninsula College teams finished second and third in the 2017 National Troubleshooting Competition, April 21-22 at Lone Star College in Atascocita, Tex. The team from the Kenai River Campus (KRC) earned second place, while the Anchorage Extension Site (AES) team finished third. Last year, AES took second place and KRC placed third.

In March, 29 teams from across the country competed for the right to go to nationals. Those teams were narrowed down to eight, and two 3-person teams from AES and KRC advanced from that qualifying round.

Read the full article here.

Source: KPC teams garner silver and bronze medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition – Green & Gold News

Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy


For many Native American students, college seems as far off as the moon. But as Buzz Aldrin said in an appearance at the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program, “Once you set your mind to get something done, seemingly anything is possible.”

ANSEP has been boosting students to university and beyond since 1995, with a plan that begins in middle school and extends into career placement after graduation. This series of intensive academic supports centered at the University of Alaska Anchorage inspires students to explore science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

As of 2016, roughly 2,000 students have taken part in the program, which has over 100 partners in the form of philanthropic organizations, corporations, educational institutions, and government agencies. It helps Natives prepare for careers within the oil and gas industry, biology, conservation, and other technical fields. The Urban Institute has categorized ANSEP as one of the most successful STEM programs in the country, propelling 85 percent of graduates to STEM careers.

Read the full article here.

Source: Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy | The Philanthropy Roundtable

Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science

There are more than 2 million images of Alaska dating back to the 1930s, all used to monitor changes due to climate, earthquakes, volcanoes and coastal erosion, according to Stephen Sparks, an imaging specialist with Quantum Spatial.

“We can look at things like how Turnagain neighborhood changed after the 1964 earthquake or how a community like Utquiagvik, formerly Barrow, has changed over time,” Sparks said. “[There are] many, many uses for the photography.”

This type of high-tech imaging and mapping is called geospatial science, and nearly every industry in Alaska uses these types of services in one form or another, according to Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC).

“Different industries that might be looking at this are in oil and gas, timber industries, federal and local state agencies to do local neighborhood mapping,” Carty said.

There are several career opportunities in geospatial science and services. Quantum Spatial, a geospatial data company in Anchorage, hires people who are pilots, aircraft mechanics, sensor operators, geologists, chemists foresters and computer programmers.

“We work a lot with oil and gas companies,” said Adam McCullough, development director with Quantum. “We will map their pipeline infrastructure and kind of model how it’s changing over time. So we can help them direct where they want to focus maintenance and repairs.”

A person starting an internship in geospatial science can earn about $15 an hour. Typically, once a person has gained experience, they earn upwards of $25 to $30 an hour, says Carty.

To see which companies are hiring, head to APICC’s website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science | KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska

Alaska is home to dozens of engineering specialties, ranging from civil to mechanical, aerospace to ship building. If there’s a big infrastructure project, chances are there was an engineer involved.

Engineers also make a broad salary, averaging anywhere from $46 to $73 per hour, according to Cassie Ostrander, a spokesperson for the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC). She and Kristina Storlie joined the Daybreak crew to discuss engineering jobs in Alaska.

Storlie used to work in the food service industry. Now, as a mechanical engineer, Storlie spends her day behind a desk or out in the field, so “every single day is completely different!” Storlie works under a professional engineer, and says she’s done everything from working on a hospital facility to the rocket launch facility on Kodiak Island.

People looking for that career change can enroll in the University of Alaska Anchorage’s or University of Alaska Fairbanks’ engineering programs, or drop in at an engineering firm and leave their resume. Ostrander said that ASRC Energy Services and CH2M both have open positions. She added that some firms will create a position for a person if they have the right skill set.

For more information, visit APICC’s website or watch the video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska | KTVA 11

Alaska February Economic Trends

trends2-2017jpg
February Trends
looks at the modern volatility of jobs in Alaska’s oil industry, comparing periods of loss since the 1980s and providing a snapshot of the industry at its most recent high, in 2015. Also this month is a profile of Hoonah, Southeast’s largest Tlingit community.

Click here to read the issue.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development