New workforce data highlights the University of Alaska’s impact on preparing students for Alaska jobs & good wages

An in-depth analysis of nine major Alaska industries captures the impact that university programs have in preparing its students for jobs in Alaska’s workforce. The reports answer key questions related to the largest and fastest growing occupations that require some postsecondary education and highlights important employment indicators such as average wages earned, where UA grads work in Alaska, what industries they work in, and how they help boost the Alaska hire rate.

The workforce development and institutional research offices at the University of Alaska partnered with the Research and Analysis Section in the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development to create the reports, which demonstrate UA graduate outcomes in nine key fields — administration and finance, aviation, construction, fisheries and marine science, health, information technology, mining, oil and gas, and teacher education. The reports can be found at https://www.alaska.edu/ research/wd/reports.php.

“We are in the business of creating Alaska’s workforce,” UA Interim President Pat Pitney told the Senate Education Committee on Feb. 3, adding that 70 to 90 percent of UA graduates stay in Alaska and find employment. 

The health report, for example, shows that of more than 2,300 nursing graduates in both 2-year and 4-year programs, 89 percent remain in Alaska after graduation and are employed at an average wage of $70,000.

Teri Cothren, University of Alaska Associate Vice President Workforce Development, said: “This data demonstrates the success of our core programs and how we are contributing to Alaska’s high‐demand industries and economy.” 

In preparing the reports, the university analyzed labor market information to identify the largest and fastest-growing occupations in the nine industries, then linked related UA programs to those jobs. Detailed employment and wage information was extracted from employer quarterly reports filed with the Dept. of Labor. That means the numbers are based on a comprehensive match of all graduates who remain and work in Alaska.

“The economic value of training and education is abundantly clear in the data,” said Dan Robinson, Chief Labor Research & Analysis, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development. “More education and training also correlate strongly with lower unemployment rates.”  

Median earnings, for example, jumped from $35,328 for high school graduates to $44,619 for Alaskans with an associate degree, $57,708 for those with a bachelor’s degree, and $77,402 for holders of graduate or professional degrees. 

Read the full article here.

Source: UA News Center

Alaska Live Job Shadows – Oil and Gas Occupations

On October 28th, Alaska guest panelists from the oil and gas industry shared about their careers in the first Alaska LIVE Job Shadows event. There were 88 unique locations who joined across the state, from individuals to classrooms to teachers who shared the event through their own Zoom link. Students were able to ask questions through the Zoom chat and through interactive Google Slides.

The Zoom recording is available to share with classrooms, students/families, colleagues, and community group: Watch here.

Find Alaska LIVE Job Shadow information, including registrations for future events on the AKCIS.org web page.

Source: Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education – AKCIS

Attend the virtual engineering and trades recruitment fair

Date: September 23, 2020
Time: 4-7 p.m.
Location: Online

Connect with employers and learn about current positions — including part-time, full-time and internship opportunities — in the engineering and trades fields on Sept. 23 from 4-7 p.m.

This event is completely virtual.

Complete the post-event survey, and you’ll be entered to win a $50 Amazon gift card!

Source: UAF Cornerstone

Alaska June Economic Trends

In June Trends: This month we look at the oil industry’s history of employment swings and how this current round of losses differs. This issue includes an update on COVID-19-related job losses based on the first available detailed data, and on who received unemployment benefits in April as a result.

Source: Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Alaska January Economic Trends

Trends begins 2019 with the Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development annual jobs forecast. For this year, they forecast a small amount of overall job growth. Regionally, the Fairbanks area’s employment will grow the most, largely tied to the preparations to house two F-35 squadrons at Eielson Air Force base over the next couple of years as well as the accompanying personnel and their families.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development