Report Highlights MSIs as ‘Underutilized Resource’ for Strengthening STEM Workforce

Providing early research experiences and creating supportive campus environments are among the promising and intentional strategies outlined in a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine focused on the impact and role of minority-serving institutions (MSIs) in producing graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Dr. Kent McGuire

The academy’s report “Minority-Serving Institutions: America’s Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce” reaffirms the relevance of MSIs and notes an urgent need to invest in the institutions to not only graduate and prepare MSI students for in-demand STEM careers, but also to sustain and enhance the nation’s economic prosperity, global competitiveness and national security, according to committee members sponsoring the report.

“This country can’t strengthen the STEM pipeline and bring more people into it without engaging the institutions where the students actually are,” said Dr. Kent McGuire, co-chair of the Committee on Closing the Equity Gap: Securing Our STEM Education and Workforce Readiness Infrastructure in the Nation’s Minority-Serving Institutions. “The conversation isn’t about, ‘Well, we can’t work with these schools because they don’t have this or they don’t have that.’ The conversation has to be, ‘We won’t actually be competitive internationally if we don’t help these schools do well what it is they do.’”

McGuire, who is also program director of education at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, added that, among other things, the report speaks to the variation among MSIs in how they serve students and also the challenges they face collectively and individually. America’s nearly 700 two- and four-year MSIs include historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).

Read the full article here. It also mentions the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) at the University of Alaska Anchorage that embodies the strategies in the report by targeting students earlier in the pipeline – as early as sixth grade – and supporting and nurturing their intellectual growth and interest in STEM fields as they matriculate through their postsecondary education.

Source: Report Highlights MSIs as ‘Underutilized Resource’ for Strengthening STEM Workforce – Diverse Issues in Higher Education

Alaska ACTE Honors Excellence in Career and Technical Education

AlaskaACTEThe Alaska Association for Career and Technical Education celebrated 13 outstanding Alaskan educators, workforce development champions, and business and community leaders with awards at their October 2018 state conference in Anchorage.

  1. Outstanding CTE Teacher of the Year: Chris Taylor, Mat-Su Career Tech High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Outstanding NEW CTE Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Business Education Compact: Vanessa Forbes, King Tech High School, Anchorage School District
  1. Business/Information Technology Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Business Week: Ken Werner, Alaska Vocational Technical Education Center
  1. Industrial/Technology Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Construction Industry Progress Fund: Peter Daley, Hutchison High School, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District
  1. Health Sciences Teacher of the Year: Kelly Woolcott, Mat-Su Career Tech High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Hospitality/Tourism Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska CHARR: Melinda Dooley, Service High School, Anchorage School District
  1. STEM Teacher of the Year, sponsored by Alaska Resource Education: John Notestine, Wasilla High School, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. CTE Administrator of the Year: Jon Clouse, Southwest Region School District
  1. Promising Practices Award, sponsored by Andrews Auctions, Appraisals and Professional Services: Christel Mozaelevskiy, Redington High School, Educators Rising Program, Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District
  1. Leadership Award, sponsored by LeCompte Consulting: Marcia Olson, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  1. Lifetime Achievement Award, sponsored by Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium: Fred Villa, Workforce Development, University of Alaska
  1. Community Contribution Award: John Plutt, Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 375, Fairbanks
  1. Community Contribution Award: Gloria Burnett, Alaska Center for Rural Health and Health Workforce/Alaska Health Education Consortium

Source: Alaska Association for Career and Technical Education

Petroleum Engineering Students Succeed at Technofest Competition

Photo courtesy of the Department of Petroleum Engineering.

For the second year in a row, UAF students from the Department of Petroleum Engineering excelled at Technofest, a competition hosted by oil and gas company BP.

Every year at BP offices around the world, challengers and interns have the opportunity to showcase their work for the wider BP community. Competitors must produce a poster to showcase a project or challenge they have been working on, and present it to a panel of judges. The competition was held in July 2018 in Anchorage.

The winners from left to right are Raymundo Lopez, Trevor Jepsen and Keith Robertson.

Source: Petroleum engineering students succeed at Technofest competition – UAF Cornerstone

 

“STEM Parent Program” Enables Families to Prepare Students for Jobs in the “New Collar” Economy

The Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE), a leading not-for-profit for educators, announced the STEM Parent Program letting families launch a career exploration experience to help their students prepare for jobs in the fast-growing “New Collar” skilled workforce in fields like manufacturing, technology, cyber and beyond.  Parents who subscribe will give their students access to STEM LifeJourney mentors through a year-long mobile app experience.

Learn more about ACTE’s STEM Parent Program by clicking here.

ACTE and LifeJourney, a career exploration and simulation company, are partnering on this new innovative experience to educate parents about new and emerging careers in today’s economy.  STEM Parent is an interactive web and mobile application that enables students to explore and test-drive some of the most in-demand STEM and New Collar technology jobs from leading organizations and government agencies such as Lockheed Martin, Tesla, Cisco, and BAE Systems.

Source: “STEM Parent Program” Enables Families to Prepare Students for Jobs in the “New Collar” Economy | ACTE

ANSEP Leads Summertime Career Development for Middle School Students

Each summer the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program hosts four STEM Career Explorations sessions that expose students to a particular facet of science, technology, engineering or math. Throughout the five-day component, students live on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus and participate in hands-on, team-based learning activities.

This year’s sessions highlight health, coding, marine science, and fisheries and wildlife biology through career exploration activities, experiments, projects and field experiences.

This component is an opportunity for students who previously attended ANSEP’s Middle School Academy to gain first-hand insight into the daily life of a STEM professional.

Source: ANSEP leads summertime career development for middle school students – The Alaska 100