Rural Alaska Honors Institute Adds Teaching and Language Options

Forty Alaska Native and rural high school students hold their Rural Alaska Honors Institute diplomas following the 2018 cap and gown ceremony at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. UAF photo by JR Ancheta

Students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Rural Alaska Honors Institute will have new options to explore teaching careers and Alaska Native languages during the summer 2019 session.

At RAHI, high school juniors and seniors from across Alaska will attend classes on the Fairbanks campus from May 28-July 12. They’ll earn up to 11 college credits, which are transferable to any college or university in the United States.

This year, RAHI will offer a new education exploration pathway, funded by the University of Alaska. UA President Jim Johnsen wants 90 percent of Alaska teachers to be educated in Alaska by 2025.

“We are excited to offer this focus on teaching as a career,” said Sandra Kowalski, director of indigenous programs at the UAF College of Rural and Community Development. “Alaska students will benefit greatly as we prepare more of them to teach in rural and Alaska classrooms. Alaskans who become teachers are more committed to staying in our communities.”

Students this year also can enroll in a new three-credit class introducing four Alaska Native languages — Iñupiaq, Athabascan, Yup’ik and Gwich’in. The elective is the first step toward earning a K-12 teaching degree with credentials in Alaska Native languages.

Learn more about RAHI at www.uaf.edu/rahi.

Source: Rural Alaska Honors Institute adds teaching and language options

Alaska Sea Grant: New Cohort of State Fellows Start Alaska-based Jobs

Photo courtesy of (left to right): Ali Schuler, Dianna Perry, Marguerite Tibbles, Kayla Schommer, and Nyssa Baechler

For the fourth year, Alaska Sea Grant has funded five graduate students to begin marine policy and science communications work with local host organizations this fall.

Modeled after the highly successful Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship, the Alaska Sea Grant State Fellowship provides recent graduates with a unique professional opportunity to work firsthand on the science and policy needed to keep Alaska’s marine resources healthy.

This year’s cohort originates from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, and the University of Washington, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: New cohort of State Fellows start Alaska-based jobs

 

UAF Mine Design Team Wins First Place in National Competition

Photo courtesy of Rajive Ganguli.

Steve Gabrielsen, Jeff Wetton, David Hernandez and Jed Hardcastle won first place in the 2018 Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Engineering Pittsburgh Coal Mining Institute of America mine design contest. Mining students from around the country submit their capstone design reports.

The trio submitted their senior design report from MIN 490, taught by Rajive Ganguli. The project centered on a Hecla-owned property in Mexico. The students consulted with Hecla professionals as they worked on the report.

For the past six years, MIN 490 mine design teams have placed in the top three five times, and have won the event twice.

Source: UAF mine design team wins first place in national competition – UAF news and information

Alaska Sea Grant: Graying of the Fleet Research Wins National Award

A woman sets her net in Egegik, Alaska. Photo by Amy Brown/Alaska Marine Conservation Council

Alaska Sea Grant-supported researchers won a national award at Sea Grant Week in Portland, Ore., this month for a study on how to boost access to Alaska commercial fisheries by young and rural residents.

The Sea Grant Association, comprised of Sea Grant program directors from 33 coastal universities, presented its Research to Application award to ASG director Heather Brandon who accepted it on behalf of the investigators for the project entitled, Graying of the Fleet in Alaska’s Fisheries: Defining the Problem and Assessing the Alternatives.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: Graying of the Fleet research wins national award – Sea Grant Alaska

Research Vessel Sikuliaq Expands Ways to Study Gulf of Alaska Ecosystems

Sikuliaq pulls into Seward before departing for the Northern Gulf of Alaska Long-term Ecological Research cruise in May. Photo by Sarah Spanos

Editor’s note: New funding and the use of the research vessel Sikuliaq have revolutionized data collection in the Gulf of Alaska by increasing the space and workforce available to conduct complex experiments at sea.

With 20 years of research and data to support their efforts, scientists in the Northern Gulf of Alaska Long-term Ecological Research program strive to better understand how physical processes and climate variability influence the base of the food web in the productive northern Gulf of Alaska. Led by researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences and their collaborators, the first LTER research expedition on Sikuliaq concluded in May 2018.

This is the first story in a four-part series documenting successes and preliminary findings from that expedition.

The Gulf of Alaska supports a diverse ecosystem that includes several commercially important fisheries, as well as culturally and economically important marine mammals and birds. All of these species are fueled by tiny organisms at the base of the food chain. Observations indicate that changes in these communities of tiny organisms are linked to climate variability, but these links are poorly understood. Researchers want to better understand these links so they can evaluate how the gulf’s fisheries and marine mammals may be impacted by changes in the environment.

Read the full article here.

Source: Research vessel Sikuliaq expands ways to study Gulf of Alaska ecosystems – News Miner