Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Fabrication

Careers in fabrication involve taking raw materials and making something useful out of them. One example is making control systems for the oil and gas industry. Alaskans who are interested can also expect a decent salary.

Lynn Johnson, a director with Dowland Bach, says entry level welders start out at around $44,000 a year and can make up to $101,000. General fabricators make about the same, and engineers start at $70,000 and can make up to $162,000 a year.

Johnson said the type of person he looks for has to have a general aptitude for mechanical work and an excellent work ethic. He added that kind of person should also expect to go home at the end of the day proud that they built something with their hands. Johnson mentioned in the past 40 years he’s been proud to see the various things his company has built around Anchorage.

Martha Peck, with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, says Alaskans can get training in-state. The Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center (NACTEC) in Nome is a good place to start. Another is getting an apprenticeship with the Sheet Metal Workers Local 23 Union.

For a list of companies hiring or more information, you can head to APICC.org.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Careers in fabrication » KTVA 11

Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy


For many Native American students, college seems as far off as the moon. But as Buzz Aldrin said in an appearance at the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program, “Once you set your mind to get something done, seemingly anything is possible.”

ANSEP has been boosting students to university and beyond since 1995, with a plan that begins in middle school and extends into career placement after graduation. This series of intensive academic supports centered at the University of Alaska Anchorage inspires students to explore science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

As of 2016, roughly 2,000 students have taken part in the program, which has over 100 partners in the form of philanthropic organizations, corporations, educational institutions, and government agencies. It helps Natives prepare for careers within the oil and gas industry, biology, conservation, and other technical fields. The Urban Institute has categorized ANSEP as one of the most successful STEM programs in the country, propelling 85 percent of graduates to STEM careers.

Read the full article here.

Source: Nonprofit Spotlight: Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program | Excellence in Philanthropy | The Philanthropy Roundtable

Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska

Alaska is home to dozens of engineering specialties, ranging from civil to mechanical, aerospace to ship building. If there’s a big infrastructure project, chances are there was an engineer involved.

Engineers also make a broad salary, averaging anywhere from $46 to $73 per hour, according to Cassie Ostrander, a spokesperson for the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC). She and Kristina Storlie joined the Daybreak crew to discuss engineering jobs in Alaska.

Storlie used to work in the food service industry. Now, as a mechanical engineer, Storlie spends her day behind a desk or out in the field, so “every single day is completely different!” Storlie works under a professional engineer, and says she’s done everything from working on a hospital facility to the rocket launch facility on Kodiak Island.

People looking for that career change can enroll in the University of Alaska Anchorage’s or University of Alaska Fairbanks’ engineering programs, or drop in at an engineering firm and leave their resume. Ostrander said that ASRC Energy Services and CH2M both have open positions. She added that some firms will create a position for a person if they have the right skill set.

For more information, visit APICC’s website or watch the video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska | KTVA 11

22 Alaskan High School Graduates Earn College Credits in ANSEP Summer Bridge Program

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA– This summer, 22 recent high school graduates from across Alaska had the opportunity to gain professional experience and earn college credit through Summer Bridge, a component of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). Working paid internships this summer before becoming full-time students at University of Alaska campuses this fall, Summer Bridge participants got hands-on experience working in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) career fields, in addition to completing a college math course.

Summer Bridge, like all ANSEP components, strives to promote STEM while encouraging historically underrepresented students to pursue careers in science and engineering at an early age. The component was adopted in 1998 as a way to mitigate problems indigenous students face due to poor math preparation as well as issues related to lack of career awareness and difficulty transitioning to the university from rural communities.

“As a former ANSEP student, graduate and the first engineer from my village, I can relate to these students on a personal level,” said ANSEP Regional Director Michael Ulroan. “It was a huge culture shock coming to the University of Alaska Anchorage from a small village in rural Alaska. ANSEP helps students navigate that transition so they can be successful.”

Read the full article here.

Source: 22 Alaskan High School Graduates Earn College Credits in ANSEP Summer Bridge Program | Alaska Native News

Kids Sample Engineering Offerings at UAA Summer Academies


UAA’s summer engineering academies are under way, with support from BP. Sessions on everything from coding and robotics to bridge design and alternative energy are available for kids to try both in Anchorage and in Mat-Su.

For more information, click here.

Source: Kids sample engineering offerings at UAA summer academies – Green & Gold News