Economic Benefits of Alaska’s Mining Industry

MiningMining is a growing force in Alaska’s economy providing jobs for thousands of Alaskans and millions of dollars in personal income throughout Alaska. Alaska’s mining industry includes exploration, mine development, and mineral production. Alaska’s mines produce coal, gold, lead, silver, zinc, as well as construction materials, such as sand, gravel, and rock.

To learn read more about the economic benefits of Alaska’s mining industry, click here.

Coeur Alaska Inc. Donates $40,000 to UAS Scholarship Fund

Coeur Award - Avery Stewart

Juneau, Alaska – Coeur Alaska Inc. has donated $40,000 to the UAS Coeur Alaska-Kensington Gold Mine Environmental Science Award this academic year. This brings a total donation of $126,500 to the University of Alaska Southeast since 2010 with $100,000 going to awards for students studying environmental science.

“Coeur Alaska – Kensington Mine values our partnership with the University of Alaska Southeast and our shared desire to train the next generation of Alaskans in the field of Environmental Science,” says Wayne Zigarlick, VP and General Manager. “We are pleased to make this contribution to the scholarship endowment fund to help students who share our dedication toward preserving and protecting the environment.”

Avery Stewart is just one of these students. A Coeur Alaska – Kensington Gold Mine Environmental Science Award recipient and a senior at UAS, Stewart is set to graduate this May with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science. He has made the Dean’s Honor List and enrolled in the UAS honors program and researched hydrology while participating in the UAS International Student Exchange program in Hungary in 2015. He plans to continue his education researching biotechnology and renewable energy and use his skills to help Alaska’s economy.

“Our state has relied heavily on our natural gas reserves, for which profits have dwindled over the last decade, but it has incredible potential for wind and hydro power that has been largely untouched.” Stewart says. “I think in the future we will have no choice but to invest in alternative energy. I’m actually really hopeful for the country and for the state.”

For more information about the University of Alaska Southeast, visit www.uas.alaska.edu or call 907-796-6100.

Source: UAS Press Release – March 21, 2017 (Photo Credit: Seanna O’Sullivan)

Want to be a millwright? Training will soon be available, in Anchorage.

What’s a millwright? It’s a seldom-discussed but absolutely crucial (and highly paid) profession that demands a meticulous eye, versatility, and expertise with everything from turbines and pumps to lasers and other highly technical equipment.

The word “millwright” conjures the thought of someone from an antique age — a leather-aproned, mustached man in a sepia photograph, sweaty, amid the dusty belts, gears and wheels of a machine shop.

The reality, now, in Alaska, is that a millwright is a person with a sophisticated range of skills who can find work in just about any of the state’s industrial sectors — including mining, oil and gas, seafood processing, power and energy, water and wastewater. Freshly minted millwrights can command a starting salary between $70,000-$120,000.

Why would companies pay that kind of coin to a person who fixes, maintains and moves industrial machinery?

They pay because millwrights know, for example, that gearboxes and turbines and hydraulic pumping and piping must be laid on a center line, with everything square and plumb. If they’re not, anything can happen: a small pump aligned improperly might draw more power so it doesn’t operate as efficiently and wastes money.

Read the full article here.

Source: Want to be a millwright? Training will soon be available, in Anchorage – Green & Gold News

Mining News: A Growing Workforce

Mining’s contribution to Alaska’s economy starts with the hefty paychecks being issued to the some 4,350 miners that work in the state, according to recent study completed by the Alaska Miners Association and McDowell Group.

The report, “The economic benefits of Alaska’s mining industry,” found that the average miner working in Alaska during 2016 received a whopping US$108,000 for the year, about double the average income across all sectors in the state. That is nearly US$470 million worth of paychecks, most of which went to Alaskans.

Read the full article here.

Source: Mining News: A growing workforce – February 19, 2017 – Petroleum News

Workforce Wednesday: Miner Training


People looking for a career in mining and wanting to get hands on training can now get their hands dirty and learn employability skills. The Mining and Petroleum Training Service, which is a part of the University of Alaska, has a training facility 30 miles outside of Delta Junction. According to Bill Bieber, who’s with MAPTS, it’s a world-class facility.

“We have the underground facility with the under ground equipment that is also used in mines like Green’s Creek and POGO,” he said. Bieber added there are also two state-of-the-art simulators for students to use. One is for surface equipment, the other is for underground. What really makes the facility unique is that the training center is underground, and students have two weeks on and two weeks off. That makes the place “camp style”, in that respect, so that when people transition they can balance life skills with the work they do. In addition, it’s also so that they’re ready to get a job as soon as they graduate.

“We have over 90 percent placement in companies all over the state,” Bieber mentioned. He went on to say that it’s a great opportunity and that people who go through it do very well in the industry.

For more information, visit the Alaska Process Industry Process Careers Consortium website.

Watch the full video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Miner Training | KTVA 11