Hecla Greens Creek Mining Company Renews $300,000 Investment in UAS Mine Training

Juneau, Alaska – Hecla Greens Creek Mining Company has pledged to renew a $300,000 commitment to the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) Center for Mine Training for their “Pathways to Mining Careers” program beginning in Fall 2017. This brings the company’s total investment in local mine training to more than $900,000 since 2011.

The program is a unique collaboration between UAS and Hecla Greens Creek instructors to prepare students for mining careers by offering introductory high school dual enrollment courses at UAS, short­-term occupational endorsements in Mine Mechanics and the Associate’s degree in Power Technology/Diesel Mechanics. The program also offers job shadowing opportunities with Hecla Greens Creek mentors. The “Pathways to Mining Careers” culminates in an opportunity for a six­ month term of probationary employment with the mine and a chance at full employment.

Read the full article here.

Source: Hecla Greens Creek Mining Company Renews $300,000 Investment in UAS Mine Training | Alaska Native News

Workforce Wednesday: Promising Industries

On Workforce Wednesday, KTVA sat down with State Economist Neil Fried who discussed what industries provided the best opportunities for someone in Alaska hoping to join the workforce.

According to Neil, some of the best industries to aim for when looking for work in the state are healthcare, mining, tourism, fishing and air cargo. These Industries are essential for Alaska, and therefore will always need positions filled.

When asked which industry provided what he believed to be the best opportunity for employment, Neil stated that he believed healthcare was the best bet. Due to people always needing care despite changing times, and how the need for healthcare grows as our population grows, that the business of healthcare was a great place to look for employment.

Neil also believes that younger people looking to enter the field are in a great position to find work in today’s world.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Promising Industries – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Workforce Wednesday: Drilling – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Drilling is one of the most in-demand career paths in Alaska today. It requires a lot of work, and long hours, but the payoff is beneficial not only as far as a paycheck is concerned, but in the way it can make you feel as though you’ve dug your boots in the ground and put real work in.

Jon McVay, vice president of Brice Civil Constructors, expressed how he believed an ideal candidate for work in the drilling industry should be someone with strong work ethic, and who is willing to spend potentially long stretches away from home to work.

If someone were to be interested in pursuing a career in drilling, McVay recommends going through Mining and Petroleum Training Services for training. Aside from the education in the field a person would receive there, McVay stated that the training service could help the trainee get established in a network of workers in the field, which could help the candidate get established in a position.

Once training was acquired, it was recommended that the candidate pursue a job as a driller’s assistant to begin their career right in the field.

The range of pay varies from $15 an hour, all the way up to $30 an hour for full-time drillers. The hours can range from 72 to 84 hours a week, with 12-hour days.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Drilling – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology

Heavy diesel technology is a profession that keeps boats, bulldozers, semi trucks and cranes running year-round.

Diesel mechanics begin earning $18 to $30 an hour to well over $100,000 a year, depending on experience.

Mechanics should have clean driving records, be able to pass a drug test and be willing to learn as technology continues to grow.

The University of Alaska Anchorage has a diesel power technology program that offers a one-year undergraduate certificate and a two-year associate degree. Jeff Libby, the director of the division, says it’s a field with a lot of potential for growth.

“We have jobs in the maritime industry, with the seafood processing industry, and construction, mining, trucking industry is pretty supportive of us,” he said. “And our program is NATEF accredited, the National Automotive Technology Education Foundation, the only one in Alaska that has the accreditation. It’s a big deal.”

Libby says they’ve seen a 20 percent increase in enrollment in the past two years, due to the job demand and pay.

To find out who’s hiring, watch the video above or contact the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium on its website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology » KTVA 11

Economic Benefits of Alaska’s Mining Industry

MiningMining is a growing force in Alaska’s economy providing jobs for thousands of Alaskans and millions of dollars in personal income throughout Alaska. Alaska’s mining industry includes exploration, mine development, and mineral production. Alaska’s mines produce coal, gold, lead, silver, zinc, as well as construction materials, such as sand, gravel, and rock.

To learn read more about the economic benefits of Alaska’s mining industry, click here.