U.S. Department of Labor Awards Alaska $3.35M to Prepare Alaskans for Work in High-Growth Industries

JUNEAU, Alaska — The U.S. Department of Labor awarded $3.35 million dollars to the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development in Trade and Economic Transition Dislocated Worker Grants. This two-year funding will expand the capacity of dislocated worker training and employment programs that prepare Alaskans for occupations in the state’s fastest growing sectors: health care, construction, and maritime industries.

“It is critical that we invest in Alaskans who seek training to be first in line for these high-paying jobs on major projects, such as the Alaska LNG Gasline,” said Alaska Governor Bill Walker. “This funding will assist as we grow our own skilled workforce to fill essential occupations; from welders and pipefitters, operating engineers, to truck drivers, laborers, electricians and mechanics.”

Dislocated Worker Grants support state, tribal, and non-profit entities that implement innovative skills training and career services for people seeking reemployment as the economy and corresponding workforce needs change. Alaska’s aging workforce will increase demand for qualified workers across all sectors, in addition to the growing number of jobs in health care, construction, and maritime industries. This funding will boost existing training and support services provided by the Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s Job Center Network.

“This funding supports our steadfast commitment to Alaska Hire and a robust, skilled workforce,” said Labor Commissioner Heidi Drygas. “It is critical that Alaskans who need to transition careers are ready to go to work in these high demand occupations, and the Department is eager to assist in that process.”

Grant funds will be available through the job centers for dislocated workers and will come in diverse forms, including:

  • Enhanced career services, support services and work-based learning opportunities
  • Training programs that lead to industry recognized credentials and employment
  • Quality pre-apprenticeship opportunities in health care and construction industry occupations
  • Support for those newly entering Registered Apprenticeships
  • Direct employment referral

For more information: Shawna Harper, Assistant Director of Workforce Development, Division of Employment and Training Services: 907-465-1882, Shawna.Harper@alaska.gov.

Source: State of Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development

UAA’s Culinary Arts Kitchen Gets New State-of-the-Art Updates

UAA’s Culinary Arts and Hospitality Administration Division’s kitchen recently underwent a major renovation, but that’s not all that’s new within the culinary school. With an in-state, online offering of the hospitality administration degree, as well as exciting new partnerships, faculty are excited to usher in a new era of culinary arts at the university.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAA’s Culinary Arts kitchen gets new state-of-the-art updates – Green & Gold News

Research Vessel Sikuliaq Expands Ways to Study Gulf of Alaska Ecosystems

Sikuliaq pulls into Seward before departing for the Northern Gulf of Alaska Long-term Ecological Research cruise in May. Photo by Sarah Spanos

Editor’s note: New funding and the use of the research vessel Sikuliaq have revolutionized data collection in the Gulf of Alaska by increasing the space and workforce available to conduct complex experiments at sea.

With 20 years of research and data to support their efforts, scientists in the Northern Gulf of Alaska Long-term Ecological Research program strive to better understand how physical processes and climate variability influence the base of the food web in the productive northern Gulf of Alaska. Led by researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences and their collaborators, the first LTER research expedition on Sikuliaq concluded in May 2018.

This is the first story in a four-part series documenting successes and preliminary findings from that expedition.

The Gulf of Alaska supports a diverse ecosystem that includes several commercially important fisheries, as well as culturally and economically important marine mammals and birds. All of these species are fueled by tiny organisms at the base of the food chain. Observations indicate that changes in these communities of tiny organisms are linked to climate variability, but these links are poorly understood. Researchers want to better understand these links so they can evaluate how the gulf’s fisheries and marine mammals may be impacted by changes in the environment.

Read the full article here.

Source: Research vessel Sikuliaq expands ways to study Gulf of Alaska ecosystems – News Miner

Alaska September Economic Trends

SeptTrendsSeptember Trends features results of our 2018 Rental Market Survey, a profile of Alaska’s auto industry, and a look at how the decennial census affects funding allocations and other important decisions. We also look at why total wages are up from this time last year, even though the state continued to lose jobs over the same period.

Also in this issue: The auto industry and how it has been less vulnerable during the recession.

Read the full issue here.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development

Perkins V Implementation | ACTE

Questions about the new Perkins law? View ACTE’s recorded webinar on the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act , including changes from prior legislation, definitions of key terms, accountability indicators, state and local planning, and more.

Source: Perkins V Implementation | ACTE