Alaska Sea Grant: New administrator and workforce development coordinator join Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant welcomed Anne Doyle as their new program administrator, who oversees development, management, analysis, reporting and administration, and is based in Fairbanks. Doyle holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Nebraska and an MBA from Ashford University. She has worked at the University of Alaska Fairbanks since 2012, most recently as the business manager for UAF Nanook Recreation.

They also welcomed Lexa Meyer, who is joining Alaska Sea Grant as coordinator for seafood workforce development in Kodiak. Meyer will provide support for the Alaska Seafood School and Alaska Sea Grant’s statewide seafood processing workforce development program. She earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Alaska Southeast and an art history degree from the University of Washington.

Learn more here.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant: COVID-19 Resources for Fishing Businesses

Alaska Sea Grant has online resources to help Alaskan seafood and fishing businesses respond to COVID-19-related issues. Included are webinars, a publication for managing business risk, and information on state and federal assistance programs.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: COVID-19 Resources

UAS student graduates with degree in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

Kayla Drumm

Juneau, Alaska (KINY) – Kayla Drumm has the distinction of being the first graduate of the joint UAS/UAF Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences degree program.

Established in 2017, the Juneau-based program takes full advantage of faculty and resources at UAF, intimate class sizes at UAS, and the natural laboratory of Southeast Alaska.  Students in the program have numerous opportunities to engage in real-world science with top faculty, and easy access to the ocean, freshwater lakes and streams, the intertidal habitat, and wetlands.

“Growing up in Alaska, I have always been interested in marine life, especially fish,” notes Drumm. “I’ve always planned on staying in Alaska and have known I wanted to work in the fisheries field. I had originally enrolled in the Marine Biology Program. I started looking into the fisheries program and decided to switch to Fisheries in the Spring of 2018. It felt like a much better fit. Later that summer I found out I was pregnant with my daughter and the mix of in-person and online classes really helped me finish my degree and succeed. I would like to thank my family, friends, and professors for all the support and encouragement. I am very excited to have my degree in a field that I love and looking forward to where it will take me.”

Dr. Mike Navarro, the UAS coordinator implementing the program, remarked that it is gratifying working with colleagues at both UAS and UAF, seeing the joint degree grow from an idea into reality. Currently, there are 12 students in the program with new students expected to sign up for the fall semester.

“Many of these students share similar backgrounds as Kayla,” said Navarro. “They are working hard to earn this degree for themselves, and like Kayla, each brings with them a valuable perspective to fisheries science.”

Navarro congratulates Drumm, who he considers a trailblazer for this degree.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAS student graduates with degree in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences -KINY 800/94.9

Alaska Sea Grant: Young fishermen learn the business and management side of commercial fishing operations

Alaska Young Fishermen’s Summit participants at the Alaska State Capitol Building in Juneau. January 2020.

Fifty fishermen from around the state gathered in Juneau in January for the eighth Alaska Young Fishermen’s Summit (AYFS) for three days of training, networking and interacting with the Alaska State Legislature. Participants of the Alaska Sea Grant event were self-selected or sponsored by their fishing organization, skipper or CDQ group and came from Atka, the Pribilof Islands, Bristol Bay, Prince William Sound, Kodiak, King Cove, Homer, Sitka, Petersburg, Juneau, Anchorage, Girdwood, Fairbanks and Ester.

The goal of AYFS is to educate new commercial fishermen in the land-based aspects of running a sustainable commercial fishing operation. Topics this year included financial management, seafood markets, understanding the science and management of commercial fisheries, participating in the commercial fisheries regulatory process, and basic safety information. Over the three days, participants also developed valuable networks with each other and with industry leaders, which will serve them in their future businesses.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: Young fishermen learn the business and management side of commercial fishing operations

Alaska Sea Grant: New training program for aspiring fishing crew in Western Alaska

A student in an April 2019 training class for new fishing crew in New Stuyahok, Alaska, practices putting on a survival suit. Photo by Gabe Dunham/Alaska Sea Grant.

Alaska’s commercial fishing industry employs more people than any other industry in the state. Yet fewer young people are entering the industry, and resources are scarce to help aspiring crew members succeed, a concern that Alaska Sea Grant has addressed with the development of a new “Crew Class” training program.

Read the full article here.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: New training program for aspiring fishing crew in Western Alaska