Senate Passes Bill to Help Fishing Industry

U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan.

Washington, DC (KINY) – U.S. Senators Dan Sullivan and Lisa Murkowski applauded the Senate’s passage of the Young Fishermen’s Development Act.

The legislation is designed to mitigate the challenges facing the next generation of entrants into the fishing industry by supporting regional training opportunities and apprenticeship programs.

Senator Sullivan said this will help keep Alaska a superpower in seafood, “Alaska is the unquestioned superpower of seafood, thanks to our world-class, sustainably-managed fisheries and our countless hard-working fishermen.  The sustainability and endurance of this vital industry, which employs more people in Alaska than any other, depends on up-and-coming qualified fishermen.”

Sullivan said the bill will reduce barriers with new grants, training opportunities and apprenticeship programs.

Senator Lisa Murkowski said the bill will address some of the barriers young people face as they try to join the commercial fishing fleet, “This legislation will support education, training and workplace development of future fishermen and help maintain sustainable fishing careers, strengthen food security, and encourage future generations of Alaskans to pursue jobs in this important industry.”

Rural communities in the U.S. have lost 30 percent of local permit holders in the past decade.  The average age of a fishermen has increase by 10 years over the past generation.

The graying of the fleet has led to an increase in financial capital and risk needed to enter into the commercial fishing industry.

Source: Senate passes bill to help fishing industry – KINY

Alaska November Economic Trends

In November Trends: With the pandemic, the seafood processing industry faced a summer salmon season like no other. Also in this issue: Fish harvesting employment’s five-year trends, and what the consumer price index shows about deflation in 2020.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

Alaska Sea Grant: New administrator and workforce development coordinator join Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant welcomed Anne Doyle as their new program administrator, who oversees development, management, analysis, reporting and administration, and is based in Fairbanks. Doyle holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Nebraska and an MBA from Ashford University. She has worked at the University of Alaska Fairbanks since 2012, most recently as the business manager for UAF Nanook Recreation.

They also welcomed Lexa Meyer, who is joining Alaska Sea Grant as coordinator for seafood workforce development in Kodiak. Meyer will provide support for the Alaska Seafood School and Alaska Sea Grant’s statewide seafood processing workforce development program. She earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Alaska Southeast and an art history degree from the University of Washington.

Learn more here.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant

Alaska Sea Grant: COVID-19 Resources for Fishing Businesses

Alaska Sea Grant has online resources to help Alaskan seafood and fishing businesses respond to COVID-19-related issues. Included are webinars, a publication for managing business risk, and information on state and federal assistance programs.

Source: Alaska Sea Grant: COVID-19 Resources

UAS student graduates with degree in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

Kayla Drumm

Juneau, Alaska (KINY) – Kayla Drumm has the distinction of being the first graduate of the joint UAS/UAF Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences degree program.

Established in 2017, the Juneau-based program takes full advantage of faculty and resources at UAF, intimate class sizes at UAS, and the natural laboratory of Southeast Alaska.  Students in the program have numerous opportunities to engage in real-world science with top faculty, and easy access to the ocean, freshwater lakes and streams, the intertidal habitat, and wetlands.

“Growing up in Alaska, I have always been interested in marine life, especially fish,” notes Drumm. “I’ve always planned on staying in Alaska and have known I wanted to work in the fisheries field. I had originally enrolled in the Marine Biology Program. I started looking into the fisheries program and decided to switch to Fisheries in the Spring of 2018. It felt like a much better fit. Later that summer I found out I was pregnant with my daughter and the mix of in-person and online classes really helped me finish my degree and succeed. I would like to thank my family, friends, and professors for all the support and encouragement. I am very excited to have my degree in a field that I love and looking forward to where it will take me.”

Dr. Mike Navarro, the UAS coordinator implementing the program, remarked that it is gratifying working with colleagues at both UAS and UAF, seeing the joint degree grow from an idea into reality. Currently, there are 12 students in the program with new students expected to sign up for the fall semester.

“Many of these students share similar backgrounds as Kayla,” said Navarro. “They are working hard to earn this degree for themselves, and like Kayla, each brings with them a valuable perspective to fisheries science.”

Navarro congratulates Drumm, who he considers a trailblazer for this degree.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAS student graduates with degree in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences -KINY 800/94.9