Alaska Workforce Investment Board Endorses Gasline Workforce Plan

AKLNGPlansJUNEAU, Alaska — The Alaska Workforce Investment Board (AWIB) unanimously approved a resolution in support of the Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s Alaska LNG Project Gasline Workforce Plan. The Alaska LNG project will create thousands of jobs, and the department’s workforce plan aims to align existing resources and identify opportunities to build training capacity to maximize Alaska hire on the gasline.

The Alaska LNG project, led by the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, will move 20 million tons of natural gas each year from Alaska’s North Slope to tidewater, where it will be liquefied and shipped by sea to Asian markets. Offtake points along the 807-mile pipeline will ensure Alaskans have access to natural gas for in-state use before it is sold to other markets. Construction is anticipated to begin in 2019, with gas delivered by 2024-2025.

“Construction and operation of the gasline will create up to 20,000 jobs and Alaskans should be first in line for these opportunities,” said Labor Commissioner Heidi Drygas. “This workforce development plan will guide efforts to ensure Alaskans can gain the skills and experience they need to build the Alaska LNG project.”

“The Alaska Workforce Investment Board works to connect Alaskans with good jobs,” said AWIB Chair Larry Bell. “We strongly endorse this workforce plan and look forward to working with other stakeholders to prioritize Alaska hire on the gasline.”

The department held public meetings in Fairbanks, Anchorage, and Kenai to solicit input for the gasline workforce plan. The plan calls for the formation of a leadership committee to draw from the expertise of business and industry, organized labor, educators, and training organizations. The committee will include representatives from the Department of Labor and Workforce Development, the University of Alaska, the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, the Department of Education and Early Development, and the AWIB. The leadership committee will develop policy and resource recommendations to prioritize education and training for the in demand occupations associated with the Alaska LNG project.

View the original press release at http://labor.alaska.gov/news/2018/news18-17.pdf

Workforce Wednesday: Construction Apprenticeships


This week on Workforce Wednesday, a look at the four apprenticeships available in the field of construction, and how you can get started.

The four types of apprenticeships we are looking at this week include carpentry, millwright work, scaffold building, and pile driving.

An entry-level apprenticeship can net around a base pay of $23 an hour. That includes $10 an hour into retirement and about $10 an hour for health benefits. Those amounts increase as you advance within the program.

Requirements for starting an apprenticeship include being over 18 years of age, having a high school diploma or equivalent, having a valid driver’s license, being an Alaskan resident and passing a drug test.

Applicants are being accepted through January of 2018 to start work in May and April.

Source: KTVA Workforce Wednesday: Construction apprenticeships

Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy

The Alaska Military Youth Academy is helping at‑risk kids get the skills they need to succeed and become job-ready.

The academy is a restart program for at‑risk youth: students who have either dropped out of high school or are in jeopardy of not graduating. Cadets live on their campus for 22 weeks, where they can earn their GED. AMYA is an accredited high school that can also teach them important job skills.

The pre‑apprenticeship program is a grant-funded four-week part of the AMYA program that trains youth, in partnership with unions, in four common construction trades. They also can train in the culinary arts and health‑related services. Before they begin formal training, students receive safety and OSHA certifications, along with scaffold building certification required in most trades.

Employability skills are embedded in everything AMYA teaches, so employers know that graduates are equipped with all of the skills necessary to be successful on the job.

Applicants must be between 16 and 18 years old and need a high-school education. To apply, visit AMYA online.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Educator with the Dept. of Corrections

The Department of Corrections (DOC) is looking for Education Coordinators and Vocational Instructors. Gary Olsen, Criminal Justice Planner of Education with the DOC, joined Daybreak Wednesday to provide details.

Vocational instructors primarily teach the construction trade: electrical, carpentry, plumbing and HVAC skills. They use the curriculum in the National Center for Construction Education and Research that is sponsored by Alaska Process Industry Career Consortium (APICC). Prisoners build a small house in the vocational trade area, getting a resume‑building certification that will help them get jobs after incarceration.

The DOC is seeking applicants with a minimum of three years as a journeyman in construction. They also consider the kinds of experience that someone has supervising crews. Applicants should have a great attitude, an ability to follow rules, policies, procedures, and classroom direction skills.

Education Coordinators perform more traditional teacher duties. They teach criminal attitudes programs, re-entry, anger management, and GED classes. The minimum qualification for this position is a bachelor’s degree in psychology, counseling, or education. Many veterans find themselves successful in this position, Olsen says, because the experience obtained while serving is excellent preparation for teaching at the DOC.

These positions yield roughly $4,000 a month. Health coverage includes eye, dental, and medical care. The state also provides a small stipend for retirement.

More positions are potentially expected to open in the future. For full descriptions, visit governmentjobs.com/careers/alaska.

For help beginning a career in the positions covered in Workforce Wednesday, contact Martha Peck with APICC at (907) 770-5250 or martha@apicc.org.

Watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Educator with the Dept. of Corrections » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats

Alaska Helmets to Hardhats is a program by Alaska Works Partnership along with Alaska Department of Labor that connects veterans or people exiting the military to free classes and training for careers in construction.

Rene Eliste, an apprentice with Alcan Electrical and Engineering says it helped him land his career in telecommunications engineering. Helmets to Hardhats isn’t limited to just that career as prospective job seekers can become sheet metal workers, laborers, millwrights and more.

Eliste said this program was beneficial because sometimes it’s hard to transition from a military career to a civilian one. He mentioned it took him months to figure it out what he wanted to do before settling into his current career.

Martha Peck with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium added the pay isn’t bad either — depending on the career they choose. Wages can range anywhere from $16.50 an hour to $47 an hour, depending on experience.

For more information, visit APICC’s website. To become a member of Helmets to Hardhats and a list of requirements, visit AlaskaWorks.org.

Watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats » KTVA 11