Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy

The Alaska Military Youth Academy is helping at‑risk kids get the skills they need to succeed and become job-ready.

The academy is a restart program for at‑risk youth: students who have either dropped out of high school or are in jeopardy of not graduating. Cadets live on their campus for 22 weeks, where they can earn their GED. AMYA is an accredited high school that can also teach them important job skills.

The pre‑apprenticeship program is a grant-funded four-week part of the AMYA program that trains youth, in partnership with unions, in four common construction trades. They also can train in the culinary arts and health‑related services. Before they begin formal training, students receive safety and OSHA certifications, along with scaffold building certification required in most trades.

Employability skills are embedded in everything AMYA teaches, so employers know that graduates are equipped with all of the skills necessary to be successful on the job.

Applicants must be between 16 and 18 years old and need a high-school education. To apply, visit AMYA online.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Alaska Military Youth Academy » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Educator with the Dept. of Corrections

The Department of Corrections (DOC) is looking for Education Coordinators and Vocational Instructors. Gary Olsen, Criminal Justice Planner of Education with the DOC, joined Daybreak Wednesday to provide details.

Vocational instructors primarily teach the construction trade: electrical, carpentry, plumbing and HVAC skills. They use the curriculum in the National Center for Construction Education and Research that is sponsored by Alaska Process Industry Career Consortium (APICC). Prisoners build a small house in the vocational trade area, getting a resume‑building certification that will help them get jobs after incarceration.

The DOC is seeking applicants with a minimum of three years as a journeyman in construction. They also consider the kinds of experience that someone has supervising crews. Applicants should have a great attitude, an ability to follow rules, policies, procedures, and classroom direction skills.

Education Coordinators perform more traditional teacher duties. They teach criminal attitudes programs, re-entry, anger management, and GED classes. The minimum qualification for this position is a bachelor’s degree in psychology, counseling, or education. Many veterans find themselves successful in this position, Olsen says, because the experience obtained while serving is excellent preparation for teaching at the DOC.

These positions yield roughly $4,000 a month. Health coverage includes eye, dental, and medical care. The state also provides a small stipend for retirement.

More positions are potentially expected to open in the future. For full descriptions, visit governmentjobs.com/careers/alaska.

For help beginning a career in the positions covered in Workforce Wednesday, contact Martha Peck with APICC at (907) 770-5250 or martha@apicc.org.

Watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Educator with the Dept. of Corrections » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats

Alaska Helmets to Hardhats is a program by Alaska Works Partnership along with Alaska Department of Labor that connects veterans or people exiting the military to free classes and training for careers in construction.

Rene Eliste, an apprentice with Alcan Electrical and Engineering says it helped him land his career in telecommunications engineering. Helmets to Hardhats isn’t limited to just that career as prospective job seekers can become sheet metal workers, laborers, millwrights and more.

Eliste said this program was beneficial because sometimes it’s hard to transition from a military career to a civilian one. He mentioned it took him months to figure it out what he wanted to do before settling into his current career.

Martha Peck with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium added the pay isn’t bad either — depending on the career they choose. Wages can range anywhere from $16.50 an hour to $47 an hour, depending on experience.

For more information, visit APICC’s website. To become a member of Helmets to Hardhats and a list of requirements, visit AlaskaWorks.org.

Watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Fabrication

Careers in fabrication involve taking raw materials and making something useful out of them. One example is making control systems for the oil and gas industry. Alaskans who are interested can also expect a decent salary.

Lynn Johnson, a director with Dowland Bach, says entry level welders start out at around $44,000 a year and can make up to $101,000. General fabricators make about the same, and engineers start at $70,000 and can make up to $162,000 a year.

Johnson said the type of person he looks for has to have a general aptitude for mechanical work and an excellent work ethic. He added that kind of person should also expect to go home at the end of the day proud that they built something with their hands. Johnson mentioned in the past 40 years he’s been proud to see the various things his company has built around Anchorage.

Martha Peck, with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, says Alaskans can get training in-state. The Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center (NACTEC) in Nome is a good place to start. Another is getting an apprenticeship with the Sheet Metal Workers Local 23 Union.

For a list of companies hiring or more information, you can head to APICC.org.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Careers in fabrication » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: The National Center for Construction Education and Research

The Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC) has become a sponsor for the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER). The NCCER is a nonprofit that helps people build skills and earn credentials across the oil and gas, construction and mining industries.

Mandy Beaulieu who is with both APICC and NCCER, says it can be used at the high school level and then rolled into a postsecondary education. It can even be used to register for an apprenticeship and then utilized in a person’s chosen industry. The program is flexible and can be used by anyone in more than 70 trades within the industry. Those trades include carpentry, iron working, and welding to name a few.

More information can be found on the APICC and NCCER websites.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: The National Center for Construction Education and Research » KTVA 11