Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats

Alaska Helmets to Hardhats is a program by Alaska Works Partnership along with Alaska Department of Labor that connects veterans or people exiting the military to free classes and training for careers in construction.

Rene Eliste, an apprentice with Alcan Electrical and Engineering says it helped him land his career in telecommunications engineering. Helmets to Hardhats isn’t limited to just that career as prospective job seekers can become sheet metal workers, laborers, millwrights and more.

Eliste said this program was beneficial because sometimes it’s hard to transition from a military career to a civilian one. He mentioned it took him months to figure it out what he wanted to do before settling into his current career.

Martha Peck with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium added the pay isn’t bad either — depending on the career they choose. Wages can range anywhere from $16.50 an hour to $47 an hour, depending on experience.

For more information, visit APICC’s website. To become a member of Helmets to Hardhats and a list of requirements, visit AlaskaWorks.org.

Watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Helmets to Hardhats » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Careers in Fabrication

Careers in fabrication involve taking raw materials and making something useful out of them. One example is making control systems for the oil and gas industry. Alaskans who are interested can also expect a decent salary.

Lynn Johnson, a director with Dowland Bach, says entry level welders start out at around $44,000 a year and can make up to $101,000. General fabricators make about the same, and engineers start at $70,000 and can make up to $162,000 a year.

Johnson said the type of person he looks for has to have a general aptitude for mechanical work and an excellent work ethic. He added that kind of person should also expect to go home at the end of the day proud that they built something with their hands. Johnson mentioned in the past 40 years he’s been proud to see the various things his company has built around Anchorage.

Martha Peck, with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, says Alaskans can get training in-state. The Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center (NACTEC) in Nome is a good place to start. Another is getting an apprenticeship with the Sheet Metal Workers Local 23 Union.

For a list of companies hiring or more information, you can head to APICC.org.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Careers in fabrication » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: The National Center for Construction Education and Research

The Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC) has become a sponsor for the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER). The NCCER is a nonprofit that helps people build skills and earn credentials across the oil and gas, construction and mining industries.

Mandy Beaulieu who is with both APICC and NCCER, says it can be used at the high school level and then rolled into a postsecondary education. It can even be used to register for an apprenticeship and then utilized in a person’s chosen industry. The program is flexible and can be used by anyone in more than 70 trades within the industry. Those trades include carpentry, iron working, and welding to name a few.

More information can be found on the APICC and NCCER websites.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: The National Center for Construction Education and Research » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska

Alaska is home to dozens of engineering specialties, ranging from civil to mechanical, aerospace to ship building. If there’s a big infrastructure project, chances are there was an engineer involved.

Engineers also make a broad salary, averaging anywhere from $46 to $73 per hour, according to Cassie Ostrander, a spokesperson for the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC). She and Kristina Storlie joined the Daybreak crew to discuss engineering jobs in Alaska.

Storlie used to work in the food service industry. Now, as a mechanical engineer, Storlie spends her day behind a desk or out in the field, so “every single day is completely different!” Storlie works under a professional engineer, and says she’s done everything from working on a hospital facility to the rocket launch facility on Kodiak Island.

People looking for that career change can enroll in the University of Alaska Anchorage’s or University of Alaska Fairbanks’ engineering programs, or drop in at an engineering firm and leave their resume. Ostrander said that ASRC Energy Services and CH2M both have open positions. She added that some firms will create a position for a person if they have the right skill set.

For more information, visit APICC’s website or watch the video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Engineering in Alaska | KTVA 11

UAA Construction Management Students Win National Competition


After months of practice, UAA construction management students saw their hard work pay off with a first place win at the most prestigious event for construction management students in the country.

“This is our third win in four attempts in the last two years — that’s a 75 percent success rate,” noted Don Tipton, assistant professor of construction management and the team’s faculty coach. “I’m really proud of how well UAA students have represented themselves and the university at the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) competition.”

UAA’s recent successes in the competition are no small feat. “Other schools have tremendous resources to prepare their students for the event,” said Tipton. Some schools even have management classes specifically designed for the ASC Competition and offer credit and designate funds for competition participation.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAA construction management students win national competition – Green & Gold News