Reports show value of UA workforce development programs

Quantifying the impact of postsecondary education on the workforce across Alaska industries has long-been a challenge for the state and university. In an effort to address this, the State Department of Labor and Workforce Development partnered with the University of Alaska (UA) to create workforce reports that demonstrate UA graduate outcomes in 10 key industries: administration and finance, aviation, construction, fisheries and marine science, health, information technology, mining, oil and gas, and teacher education. Each report highlights the largest and fastest-growing occupations within each industry that require postsecondary education, average wages earned over time, the percentage of graduates employed across Alaska’s six economic regions, what industries they work in, and how they contribute to the Alaska hire rate. More than 17,700 UA graduates over a ten year period were included in the report data, and 96.3 percent are working in Alaska today averaging $69K annually. The reports can be found at https://www.alaska.edu/research/wd/reports.php.

Read the full article here.

Source: Reports show value of UA workforce development programs | Juneau Empire

New workforce data highlights the University of Alaska’s impact on preparing students for Alaska jobs & good wages

An in-depth analysis of nine major Alaska industries captures the impact that university programs have in preparing its students for jobs in Alaska’s workforce. The reports answer key questions related to the largest and fastest growing occupations that require some postsecondary education and highlights important employment indicators such as average wages earned, where UA grads work in Alaska, what industries they work in, and how they help boost the Alaska hire rate.

The workforce development and institutional research offices at the University of Alaska partnered with the Research and Analysis Section in the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development to create the reports, which demonstrate UA graduate outcomes in nine key fields — administration and finance, aviation, construction, fisheries and marine science, health, information technology, mining, oil and gas, and teacher education. The reports can be found at https://www.alaska.edu/ research/wd/reports.php.

“We are in the business of creating Alaska’s workforce,” UA Interim President Pat Pitney told the Senate Education Committee on Feb. 3, adding that 70 to 90 percent of UA graduates stay in Alaska and find employment. 

The health report, for example, shows that of more than 2,300 nursing graduates in both 2-year and 4-year programs, 89 percent remain in Alaska after graduation and are employed at an average wage of $70,000.

Teri Cothren, University of Alaska Associate Vice President Workforce Development, said: “This data demonstrates the success of our core programs and how we are contributing to Alaska’s high‐demand industries and economy.” 

In preparing the reports, the university analyzed labor market information to identify the largest and fastest-growing occupations in the nine industries, then linked related UA programs to those jobs. Detailed employment and wage information was extracted from employer quarterly reports filed with the Dept. of Labor. That means the numbers are based on a comprehensive match of all graduates who remain and work in Alaska.

“The economic value of training and education is abundantly clear in the data,” said Dan Robinson, Chief Labor Research & Analysis, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development. “More education and training also correlate strongly with lower unemployment rates.”  

Median earnings, for example, jumped from $35,328 for high school graduates to $44,619 for Alaskans with an associate degree, $57,708 for those with a bachelor’s degree, and $77,402 for holders of graduate or professional degrees. 

Read the full article here.

Source: UA News Center

Alaska Live Job Shadows – Construction Occupations

Alaska guest panelists from the construction industry recently shared about their careers in an Alaska live job shadow event. There were 60 unique locations represented across the state, from individuals to classrooms to teachers who shared the event through their own Zoom link. Students were able to ask questions through the Zoom chat and through interactive Google Slides.

The Zoom recording is available to share out to classrooms, students/families, colleagues, and community groups: Watch Here

Find Alaska LIVE Job Shadow information, including registrations for future events on the AKCIS.org web page.

Source: Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education – AKCIS

UAS Women in Construction Scholarship

Up to $2200 in tuition assistance available per student to encourage women in construction.

Need some extra support this semester? Want to try out a new program? Are you a woman interested in trying construction classes and joining the Construction Technology Program at UAS? Let us help you. We have scholarship funds that will pay for courses in construction. Earn credit in Occupation Endorsements, Certificates and an Associate’s degree. Learn useful skills leading to good job opportunities in the local construction industry; including drafting, wood framing, finish carpentry, welding and contractor licensing. Get started on your future career today.

For more information on the requirements for this tuition assistance.  Contact: Robin Gilcrist – 796-6141 – regilcrist@alaska.edu

Source: UAS School of Career and Technical Education

What is NCCER? – Alaska Safety Alliance

What is NCCER?

  • A not-for-profit education foundation created in 1996 as The National Center for Construction Education and Research (dba.NCCER). It was developed with the support of more than 125 construction CEO’s, associations, and academic leaders who come together to transform training for the construction industry. Twenty-four years ago, NCCER started with just 5 content areas and now twenty-four years later they have developed curricula for more than 70 craft areas and completed a series of more than 70 assessments offered in over 6,000 NCCER-accredited training assessment locations across the United States.
  • NCCER develops standardized construction and maintenance curriculum and assessments with portable credentials. These credentials are tracked through NCCER’s Registry System that allows organizations and companies to track the qualifications of their craft professionals by maintaining their records in a secure database.
  • NCCER’s workforce development process of accreditation , instructor certification. standardized curriculum, registry, assessment, and certification is a key component in the industry’s workforce development efforts. NCCER also drives multiple initiatives to enhance career development and recruitment efforts for the industry, primarily through its Build Your Future initiative. http://www.BYF.org

Read the full blog post here.

Source: What is NCCER? – Alaska Safety Alliance