Anchorage Science Teacher Named 2018 Alaska Teacher of the Year

Ben Walker teaches seventh-grade science in the same Romig Middle School classroom that his mother once did.

For 11 years, his wife taught science in the classroom next door.

“Science runs in this family,” said Anchorage School District Superintendent Deena Bishop.

So does teaching.

And earlier this month, Walker earned the highest teaching honor awarded by the Alaska education department.

Alaska Education Commissioner Michael Johnson named Walker the 2018 Alaska Teacher of the Year at a surprise, school-wide assembly Thursday morning at the West Anchorage middle school in front of a crowd of energetic students, co-workers and family members, including his two children, who clapped and cheered in response to the news.

Read the full article here.

Source: Anchorage science teacher named 2018 Alaska Teacher of the Year – Alaska Dispatch News

With an Impending Nursing Shortage, UAA’s School of Nursing Steps up to the Plate


UAA School of Nursing students suit up for operating room (OR) orientation. Courtesy of UAA School of Nursing.

In the United States, health care is one of the fastest growing job sectors in the country. According to the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, in 2014, 11.8 million workers were employed in the health care industry, with 2.7 million of that workforce represented by registered nurses. With the average age of nurses being 50 or older, and 30 percent of that workforce preparing to retire, public and private health care organizations across the country, including in Alaska, are bracing for a nationwide nursing shortage.

It’s not the first time this has happened. The health care industry experienced a similar nationwide nursing shortage in the 1970s and ’80s as more women entered the workforce with alternative career options than the traditional nurse, school teacher or secretary that their mothers or grandmothers had.

Alaska has not been immune to these national trends and experienced similar shortages during the ’70s and ’80s along with the rest of the country. Briefly during the ’90s and early 2000s the health care industry in Alaska recovered. But with an aging nursing population heading into retirement over the next decade, Alaska’s health care industry is turning to Alaska’s university to lead the charge in educating the next generation of nurses.

Read the full article here.

Source: With an impending nursing shortage, UAA’s School of Nursing steps up to the plate -The Cordova Times

Workforce Wednesday: Medical Science Academy at Bartlett High School

For the past eight years, Bartlett High School has been getting the next wave of medical professionals interested in the industry. The program is called the Medical Science Academy, and is open to most students in the Anchorage School District.

Sean Prince, Bartlett’s principal, says it has one primary teacher who teaches a wide range of the classes. Her name is Yvette Stone, and she started the program almost a decade ago. Stone has been teaching for nearly 20 years, according to Prince. She teaches anatomy and physiology classes, even some advanced classes students can get college credit for. Students who go through the program will even job shadow over at JBER. While there, they will experience live births, work in the pharmacy and more.

One soon to be graduate, Sunecke “Journey” Prieto said going through the program reinforced her interest in neurosciences. She plans to go to Oklahoma to pursue becoming a neurologist.

More information can be found at the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium website. Bartlett is an open enrollment school. If a student is interested they, or a parent, can head to the Anchorage School District’s website and apply for an exemption, and then start in the Medical Science Academy.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Medical Science Academy at Bartlett High School – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Coast Guard Signs Memorandum of Agreement with University of Alaska Southeast

Coast Guard Rear Adm. Michael McAllister, 17th District commander, and University of Alaska Southeast Chancellor Rick Caulfield shake hands after signing a memorandum of agreement between the Coast Guard and UAS during a ceremony in Juneau, Alaska, Oct. 2, 2017. The MOA makes UAS the first Alaskan college to host the Coast Guard’s College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Shawn Eggert)

On behalf of the Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Paul Zunkuft, Rear Adm. Michael McAllister, Seventeenth Coast Guard District commander, signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the University of Alaska Southeast, establishing the university as a member of the Coast Guard’s Minority-Serving Institution partnership program.

The purpose of the program is for the Coast Guard to recruit, retain and sustain a ready, diverse and highly skilled workforce.

“Our people are our most important investment, and the Coast Guard must engage and retain the most qualified and inclusively diverse workforce,” said McAllister. “For 150 years, the Coast Guard’s ability to serve and protect Alaska has grown alongside the state’s increasingly prominent role in national sovereignty and maritime commerce. With this MOA we have an opportunity to attract young people that know what it means to live and work on the water.”

Central to this partnership is the Coast Guard’s College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative scholarship program. CSPI is a program designed for motivated individuals who demonstrate high academic and leadership excellence, and desire to serve their country in the United States Coast Guard. Students can apply if they are currently enrolled, accepted for enrollment or pending enrollment in a full-time bachelor’s degree program at Minority-Serving Institutions and have the desire to receive a guaranteed commission as an officer in the United States Coast Guard.

Read the full article here.

Source: Coast Guard Signs Memorandum of Agreement with University of Alaska Southeast – Alaska Business Magazine

Crowley Awards Scholarships Worth $10,000 to Four UAF Students

Crowley Fuels recently announced that it has awarded $10,000 in Thomas B. Crowley Sr. Memorial Scholarships to four University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) students: Keenan Sanderson, Gabe Smith and twin brothers Carlton and Kendrick Hautala. Chosen for their academic achievements and meeting other scholarship criteria, each student received $2,500 toward his tuition from Crowley.

Crowley’s financial support, administered by the UAF College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, can be used towards any area of study, and preference is given to recipient students from Crowley-served rural communities throughout the state, including Aniak, Bethel, Delta Junction, Fairbanks, Ft. Yukon, Galena, Glennallen, Hooper Bay, Juneau, Kenai, Ketchikan, Kotzebue, Naknek, Nenana, Nome, Palmer, St. Mary’s, Talkeetna, Valdez and Wasilla.

“Crowley is proud to contribute to the academic success of these highly-motivated UAF students,” said Crowley’s Jasper Hall, vice president, highway petroleum distribution. “Established in 2010, this program continues to support students who are committed to pursuing higher education as a means to help their communities and Alaska. Each of these recipients is passionate about maintaining our state’s natural resources, an endeavor that Crowley is pleased to support.”

Read the full article here.

Source: Crowley Awards Scholarships Worth $10,000 to Four UAF Students – News9.com – Oklahoma City, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports |