KPC Teams Garner Silver and Bronze Medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition

Kenai Peninsula College teams finished second and third in the 2017 National Troubleshooting Competition, April 21-22 at Lone Star College in Atascocita, Tex. The team from the Kenai River Campus (KRC) earned second place, while the Anchorage Extension Site (AES) team finished third. Last year, AES took second place and KRC placed third.

In March, 29 teams from across the country competed for the right to go to nationals. Those teams were narrowed down to eight, and two 3-person teams from AES and KRC advanced from that qualifying round.

Read the full article here.

Source: KPC teams garner silver and bronze medals at National Process Troubleshooting Competition – Green & Gold News

Alaska AHEC Program Selected as Alaska Career Preparedness Award Recipient

The Alaska Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program is proud to announce that it has been selected as the Alaska Career Preparedness Award recipient for the ACT College and Career Readiness Campaign. As the ACT College and Career Transition Award exemplar for Alaska, the Alaska AHEC has the opportunity to be considered for National Semifinalist status by an ACT Selection Committee. This committee will narrow the extremely deserving field of state exemplars into four National Semifinalists. Finally, a National Selection Committee composed of national education and workforce leaders will choose from the Semifinalists the four National Exemplars, one per category. These National Exemplars, along with all state exemplars and semifinalists, will be honored at an ACT event in late fall 2017. The Alaska AHEC would like to send a special thank you to all their partners and supporters.

Source: Alaska AHEC Program selected as Alaska Career Preparedness Award recipient – UAA Green & Gold News

UAA Starting Surgical Technology Program in Response to Industry Need

The University of Alaska Anchorage is in the final stages of starting a new program that focuses on positions that assist doctors during surgery.

It’s called the surgical technology program, and the curriculum will train students for difficult-to-fill positions in the state’s health care industry.

Robin Wahto, director of UAA’s School of Allied Health, said the Surgical Technology program was created in response to industry need.

“Many of the larger institutions are currently hiring folks from outside to move to Alaska to fill those positions,” Wahto said. “We obviously want to be able to help fill some of those positions with people who are here in Alaska.”

Surgical technologists assist surgeons in a variety of ways, including preparing the operating room, ensuring equipment is working properly and by maintaining a sterile operating environment.

A survey by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development estimates the need for surgical technologists to grow 13 percent by 2024.

Read the full article here.

Source: UAA starting surgical technology program in response to industry need – KTOO

Workforce Wednesday: Software Development

Software developers can solve all sorts of real world problems — from timing the Iron Dog race, to how the Alaska Department of Fish and Game collects data.

Geoff Wright, president of Pango Technology in Anchorage, says developers help build software that impacts how oil moves through our pipeline, or to the maintenance of cell towers. He said Pango is currently working with the Division of Motor Vehicles to improve its testing.

Wright said, for instance, Pango helped to make software that replaced the manual timing of the Iron Dog snow machine race. Another example is working with the Department of Fish and Game to replace its old pen and paper system of counting fish, to a smartphone based system. Under the new system a fish could be logged as soon as it’s caught and reported back the state biologist.

Pango typically recruits from the University of Alaska Anchorage. Wright mentioned the company has an active apprenticeship program that has worked out very well for them. The company tries to get the students as soon as they graduate.

Cassie Ostrander with the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium said starting out, people can make around $4,000 a month. The wage can go as high as $9,000 a month with more experience. Ostrander added that Pango is hiring, as well as GCI, KTVA’s parent company, and the Municipality of Anchorage.

For more information, head to either APICC’s or Pango Technology’s website.

Watch this Workforce Wednesday video segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Software development » KTVA 11

CAEPR Releases Report on the Cost of Teacher Turnover in Alaska

CAEPERReport
Alaska faces challenges recruiting and retaining educators, especially in its rural and remote communities. A new report, “The cost of teacher turnover in Alaska” by Dayna Jean DeFeo, Trang Tran, Diane Hirshberg, Dale Cope and Pam Cravez, details the costs associated with teacher turnover and calculates an average per-teacher cost in four categories: separation, recruitment, hiring and induction. It details actual dollars allocated to these activities and makes recommendations for policy and practice. Download the report at the Center for Alaska Education Policy Research website.

Source: CAEPR releases report on the cost of teacher turnover in Alaska – Green & Gold News