Studying Horsepower in the Digital Age

HorsepowerJustin Gentz loves to go fast. He built his first engine when he was a sophomore in high school. Now, through UAA’s GM Automotive Service Educational Program, Gentz is learning to work on the latest in automotive technology — including some very fast cars.

Watch the short video here.

Source: Studying horsepower in the digital age – Green & Gold News

UAF Offers Drone Check-Outs to Students in Pilot Program

Drone popularity has been sky high – and just this week, drone enthusiasts at UAF made it possible to rent one.

They’ve got four mini drones that are called ‘Tiny Whoops’. They’re small first-person-view aircraft that you operate with a video game-like controller. The Tiny Whoop has a camera and monitor that allows you to watch where you’re flying, and even record it.

They’ve set up a hula-a-hoop course in the basement of the Mather library on campus. Anyone with a valid polar express card can rent one after watching an instructional video. Then, it’s like checking out a library book.

Kick-starter, Mathew Westhoff, says this is just the beginning of what’s to come. He has plans to get even more people involved with drone racing.

“Down in the lower 48, a lot of colleges have race teams like this; like they do normal sports teams. And we figured this would be a great thing to do, you know six months out of the year here in Alaska, and it is kind of harsh temperatures so this will be a great thing to really allow them to do year round. Kind of a way to get the kids involved with learning new things and getting them involved with computer science and engineering skills without them really knowing. We do plan actually to put on a camp for middle school, high school kids that we’re going to do here on campus and we’ll end up having a race in the patty ice center at the end of it.” – Matthew Westhoff, Unmanned Aircraft Pilot

Source: UAF Offers Drone Check-Outs to Students in Pilot Program – 13 KXDF Fairbanks

“I honestly thought I would never get here.”

Giancarlo Mone, studying applied technology leadership, is a first-generation Italian-American and—as of this semester—a first-generation college student, too. (Photo by James Evans / University of Alaska Anchorage)

A former New York City garbageman, Giancarlo Mone is a both a first-generation Italian-American and—as of this semester—a first-generation college student, too. “I don’t see myself moving back,” he noted. “I wanted to see intellectual smarts in a blue-collar world, and I feel Alaska has that.”

Read the full article here.

Source: “I honestly thought I would never get here.” – Green & Gold News

Automotive Dealers Bring Chrysler Training to Alaska

Want to work on the Dodge Challenger? Or a Jeep Wrangler? Maybe that rare winterized Maserati or Alfa Romeo?

Through a new partnership between Fiat Chrysler Automotive (FCA) and the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), automotive students and current technicians now have greater access to the company’s wide fleet of vehicles without leaving the state.

The new partnership between the university and automaker will expand opportunities for students, save money for the dealerships, and meet a growing national need for technicians. Currently, Alaska’s Chrysler dealerships send technicians to training centers in the Lower 48. This program will start training students on FCA cars before they reach the dealerships, and allow current technicians to receive up-to-date training in Anchorage instead.

The partnership is a product of the National Coalition of Certification Centers (NC3), a nonprofit that connects the dots between colleges and companies in transportation, energy and manufacturing. Through the new agreement, FCA gives the university access to web-based training programs typically available only to full-time technicians, and allows a UAA faculty member to earn certifications as an FCA trainer.

“If you want to work for Anchorage Chrysler as a service technician, you would have to do these training modules that we’re just basically going to integrate into our program” explained Jeff Libby, director of the university’s Transportation and Power Division. That saves time for students, and allows them to graduate with industry-recognized certifications. UAA already offers a similar track with General Motors. “It definitely means that they’re going to have employment opportunities,” Libby said.

The partnership will unfold in two steps. First, UAA will incorporate the automaker’s online training into its regular automotive curriculum. NC3 predicts students who complete the FCA online training—which keeps pace with new models and technology—will be able to perform 50 percent of warranty work in a service department by the time they graduate.

Read the full article here.

Source: Automotive dealers bring Chrysler training to Alaska – Green & Gold News

Workforce Wednesday: Aviation Maintenance Technologies

On this workforce Wednesday, we take a look at the field of aviation maintenance technologies. A technician in this field is responsible for replacing and repairing plane parts, and diagnosing maintenance problems as they arise. We were joined by Paul Herrick with UAA’s aviation technology department.

He described the local program at UAA that prepares students to take the certification exam necessary to become a certified mechanic or a maintenance technician. The program is FAA approved, and Paul considers the program within the top ten percent as far as quality in the nation.

The best type of person suited for the job, according to Paul, is a person with attention to detail, who can remain focused and exact. Someone with a strong sense of responsibility is also preferred, as they are protecting the public’s safety.

Positions in aviation maintenance technologies typically pay between $22 and $45 an hour, but that scale is largely based on experience and time within a certain company.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Aviation maintenance technologies – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska