Workforce Wednesday: Maritime Industry Apprenticeships

The Calista Corporation has partnered with AVTEC in Seward for an entry-level apprenticeship program aimed at high school students and graduates.

Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium says students will learn nautical and shoreside skills, how to navigate in the waters of Alaska, as well as get certifications and on-the-job training. Students will also have access to a state of the art simulator to hone their navigation skills.

Brenda Pacarro, with the Calista Corporation, said the organization recognized the need for Alaskans to receive training in order to be more employable. Pacarro wants the maritime industry to know it has trained and motivated candidates ready to enter the workforce.

There are scholarships available and Carty said there are a few requirements. For example, candidates need to be drug and alcohol free.

Those interested in scholarships or funding can get in touch with the Calista Corporation. Students or graduates interested in the apprenticeship program can visit the website, akmaritimeapp.com to apply or learn more.

To watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment, click here.

Correction: In the video, Carty said the pay for deckhands was $250 an hour.  The pay averages about $250 per day.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Maritime industry apprenticeships | KTVA 11

Aeronautics in the Far North: Success of Poker Flat, Unmanned Aircraft Program Benefits Alaska

The University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Poker Flat Research Range closed out its launch season earlier this month with a bang — three of them, to be precise. Early in the morning of March 2, three Black Brant IX sounding rockets streaked into the ionosphere, carrying instruments to study the aurora borealis’ visible structure and the formation of auroral “jets” caused by Earth’s magnetic field. In the almost 50 years since its founding, Poker Flat has been a consistent driver for UAF research, a vehicle for advances in atmospheric science and one of the university’s biggest success stories.

Launch seasons at the facility take place from January to March and usually see a handful of rockets fly each year. This year, there were five, with four of them clustered in late February and early March. The range plays a big part in UAF’s space research efforts as well as NASA’s near-Earth space science. At its humble beginnings, the future success of the range would have been hard to predict.

Read the full article here.

Source: Aeronautics in the far north: Success of Poker Flat, unmanned aircraft program benefits Alaska | Editorials | newsminer.com

Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science

There are more than 2 million images of Alaska dating back to the 1930s, all used to monitor changes due to climate, earthquakes, volcanoes and coastal erosion, according to Stephen Sparks, an imaging specialist with Quantum Spatial.

“We can look at things like how Turnagain neighborhood changed after the 1964 earthquake or how a community like Utquiagvik, formerly Barrow, has changed over time,” Sparks said. “[There are] many, many uses for the photography.”

This type of high-tech imaging and mapping is called geospatial science, and nearly every industry in Alaska uses these types of services in one form or another, according to Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium (APICC).

“Different industries that might be looking at this are in oil and gas, timber industries, federal and local state agencies to do local neighborhood mapping,” Carty said.

There are several career opportunities in geospatial science and services. Quantum Spatial, a geospatial data company in Anchorage, hires people who are pilots, aircraft mechanics, sensor operators, geologists, chemists foresters and computer programmers.

“We work a lot with oil and gas companies,” said Adam McCullough, development director with Quantum. “We will map their pipeline infrastructure and kind of model how it’s changing over time. So we can help them direct where they want to focus maintenance and repairs.”

A person starting an internship in geospatial science can earn about $15 an hour. Typically, once a person has gained experience, they earn upwards of $25 to $30 an hour, says Carty.

To see which companies are hiring, head to APICC’s website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Geospatial Science | KTVA 11

New Apprenticeship programs Aim to Train Alaska Workers Amid a Tough Job Market

The state is expected to see another year of job losses. But some fields are embarking on new training programs.

The Alaska Air Carriers Association is developing new apprenticeships for future pilots and mechanics. The Alaska Primary Care Association wants to train people to be health workers, medical billers or medical assistants. Alaska Native corporation Calista Corp. just announced a new maritime apprenticeship program.

The hope is that they’ll be able to help steer some Alaskans into areas where they might be able to find careers, despite the state’s economic downturn.

Read the full article here.

Source: New apprenticeship programs aim to train Alaska workers amid a tough job market – Alaska Dispatch News