Workforce Wednesday: Aviation Maintenance Technologies

On this workforce Wednesday, we take a look at the field of aviation maintenance technologies. A technician in this field is responsible for replacing and repairing plane parts, and diagnosing maintenance problems as they arise. We were joined by Paul Herrick with UAA’s aviation technology department.

He described the local program at UAA that prepares students to take the certification exam necessary to become a certified mechanic or a maintenance technician. The program is FAA approved, and Paul considers the program within the top ten percent as far as quality in the nation.

The best type of person suited for the job, according to Paul, is a person with attention to detail, who can remain focused and exact. Someone with a strong sense of responsibility is also preferred, as they are protecting the public’s safety.

Positions in aviation maintenance technologies typically pay between $22 and $45 an hour, but that scale is largely based on experience and time within a certain company.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Aviation maintenance technologies – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Workforce Wednesday: Promising Industries

On Workforce Wednesday, KTVA sat down with State Economist Neil Fried who discussed what industries provided the best opportunities for someone in Alaska hoping to join the workforce.

According to Neil, some of the best industries to aim for when looking for work in the state are healthcare, mining, tourism, fishing and air cargo. These Industries are essential for Alaska, and therefore will always need positions filled.

When asked which industry provided what he believed to be the best opportunity for employment, Neil stated that he believed healthcare was the best bet. Due to people always needing care despite changing times, and how the need for healthcare grows as our population grows, that the business of healthcare was a great place to look for employment.

Neil also believes that younger people looking to enter the field are in a great position to find work in today’s world.

Watch the Workforce Wednesday segment here.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Promising Industries – KTVA 11 – The Voice of Alaska

Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology

Heavy diesel technology is a profession that keeps boats, bulldozers, semi trucks and cranes running year-round.

Diesel mechanics begin earning $18 to $30 an hour to well over $100,000 a year, depending on experience.

Mechanics should have clean driving records, be able to pass a drug test and be willing to learn as technology continues to grow.

The University of Alaska Anchorage has a diesel power technology program that offers a one-year undergraduate certificate and a two-year associate degree. Jeff Libby, the director of the division, says it’s a field with a lot of potential for growth.

“We have jobs in the maritime industry, with the seafood processing industry, and construction, mining, trucking industry is pretty supportive of us,” he said. “And our program is NATEF accredited, the National Automotive Technology Education Foundation, the only one in Alaska that has the accreditation. It’s a big deal.”

Libby says they’ve seen a 20 percent increase in enrollment in the past two years, due to the job demand and pay.

To find out who’s hiring, watch the video above or contact the Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium on its website.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Heavy Diesel Technology » KTVA 11

Workforce Wednesday: Maritime Industry Apprenticeships

The Calista Corporation has partnered with AVTEC in Seward for an entry-level apprenticeship program aimed at high school students and graduates.

Cari-Ann Carty with Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium says students will learn nautical and shoreside skills, how to navigate in the waters of Alaska, as well as get certifications and on-the-job training. Students will also have access to a state of the art simulator to hone their navigation skills.

Brenda Pacarro, with the Calista Corporation, said the organization recognized the need for Alaskans to receive training in order to be more employable. Pacarro wants the maritime industry to know it has trained and motivated candidates ready to enter the workforce.

There are scholarships available and Carty said there are a few requirements. For example, candidates need to be drug and alcohol free.

Those interested in scholarships or funding can get in touch with the Calista Corporation. Students or graduates interested in the apprenticeship program can visit the website, akmaritimeapp.com to apply or learn more.

To watch the full Workforce Wednesday video segment, click here.

Correction: In the video, Carty said the pay for deckhands was $250 an hour.  The pay averages about $250 per day.

Source: Workforce Wednesday: Maritime industry apprenticeships | KTVA 11

Aeronautics in the Far North: Success of Poker Flat, Unmanned Aircraft Program Benefits Alaska

The University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Poker Flat Research Range closed out its launch season earlier this month with a bang — three of them, to be precise. Early in the morning of March 2, three Black Brant IX sounding rockets streaked into the ionosphere, carrying instruments to study the aurora borealis’ visible structure and the formation of auroral “jets” caused by Earth’s magnetic field. In the almost 50 years since its founding, Poker Flat has been a consistent driver for UAF research, a vehicle for advances in atmospheric science and one of the university’s biggest success stories.

Launch seasons at the facility take place from January to March and usually see a handful of rockets fly each year. This year, there were five, with four of them clustered in late February and early March. The range plays a big part in UAF’s space research efforts as well as NASA’s near-Earth space science. At its humble beginnings, the future success of the range would have been hard to predict.

Read the full article here.

Source: Aeronautics in the far north: Success of Poker Flat, unmanned aircraft program benefits Alaska | Editorials | newsminer.com